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Shop AutoPartsToys.com for all Your Car, Truck and SUV Accessories at Direct Factory Warehouse Pricing


Shop AutoPartsToys.com for all Your Car, Truck and SUV Accessories at Direct Factory Warehouse Pricing


Shop AutoPartsToys.com for all Your Car, Truck and SUV Accessories at Direct Factory Warehouse Pricing

Automotive Wipers, Filters, Oil & Lubricants

This forum is for automotive maintenance parts such as wiper blades, filters, oil & lubricants and other normally maintained items on cars and trucks. 


20 topics in this forum

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  1. PTC Expands Filter Program

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    • SPRINGFIELD, Mo., July 01, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- O’Reilly Automotive, Inc. (the “Company” or “O’Reilly”) (Nasdaq: ORLY), a leading retailer in the automotive aftermarket industry, announces the release date for its second quarter 2022 results as Wednesday, July 27, 2022, with a conference call to follow on Thursday, July 28, 2022. link hidden, please login to view
    • Get up to $20 back with purchase of select Mobil 1 oil.View on RockAuto.com
    • Simply add qualifying Moog parts to your cart and instantly save 10%View on RockAuto.com
    • Continental’s line of ATE replacement brake fluids feature special formulations designed to help maximize brake-system performance in all types of electronic, hydraulic and racing systems. The full line includes ATE Super DOT 5.1, the technological standard for brake fluids; ATE SL.6 Brake Fluid, the ideal replacement for ESP, ABS and ASR electronic brake systems; ATE SL for hydraulic brake and clutch systems; and ATE TYP 200 for high-performance and racing applications. ATE Super DOT 5.1 Premium Brake Fluid’s formulation sets a new performance standard for brake fluids, according to Continental. It combines a high wet boiling point of 356 F with outstanding viscosity at very low temperatures to deliver a capability that previous brake fluids were unable to achieve. With a maximum of 750 mm²/sec. at minus 40 F, ATE Super DOT 5.1 viscosity values exceed even those of ISO Class 6, which are well above the specifications for DOT 5.1 class brake fluids, according to the company. ATE SL.6 brake fluidis the optimum replacement for DOT 4 fluid in ESP, ABS and ASR brake systems. Its low-viscosity texture allows electronic brake systems to react more quickly for improved safety. ATE SL.6 offersexcellent application coverage for the advanced braking systems used in high-end vehicle makes and models. ATE SL brake fluidis an excellent DOT 4 replacement for use as hydraulic fluid in brake and clutch systems. It features a mixture of polyethylene glycol ethers, polyethylene glycols and boric acid esters of polyethylene glycols with anti-corrosion/anti-aging agents. ATE SL meets and exceeds the requirements of the brake-fluid standards FMVSS-No. 116 – DOT 4, SAE J1704 and ISO 4925, Class 4, among others. ATE TYP 200 brake fluid exceeds all DOT 4 standards and excels under the extreme demands of high-performance driving. Compatible with all DOT 3, DOT 4 and DOT 5.1 brake fluids, the formula delivers a minimal drop in boiling point due to outstanding water-binding properties that result in a long-lasting fluid that can provide optimal performance for up to three years under normal highway driving conditions, according to Continental. The high wet and dry boiling points make this fluid an excellent choice for street-driven vehicles as well. “ATE brake fluids are the result of many years of experience and expertise in developing OE brake systems,” notes Dan Caciolo, head of product management at Continental. “The viscosity, boiling point and pressure behavior of our fluids interact perfectly to allow the braking system to react quickly and reliably in any application. Our boiling points and viscosity exceed legal specifications, while our high-quality additives help deliver outstanding corrosion protection and optimum compatibility with brake system’s sealing materials.” ATE is an aftermarket brand of Continental. For more information, visit link hidden, please login to view or contact [email protected] The post link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view. link hidden, please login to view
    • Electric vehicles, specifically those that are 100% battery powered (BEVs) have everyone “amped up” and anxious to get the most “current” projections on sales, share of the car parc and long-term impact on the aftermarket parts and service business. The impact of BEVs will be felt slowly over a very long time. But the time to get educated and prepared is now. Beginning with the joint industry report at AAPEX from the Auto Care Association and AASA and continuing with presentations at the AASA Technology Council and Vision conference this spring, forecasts about BEV sales and their trajectory of market share have fascinated and frightened those who grew up with and depend upon the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) for their livelihood. The consensus I heard is that the demise of the internal combustion engine has been exaggerated and the growth forecasts of BEV market share are optimistic considering the limits of current battery technology, tepid consumer demand resulting from the high cost, and shortcomings in charging infrastructure and the electric grid. There is no secret that CO2 emissions are responsible for changing the chemistry of our atmosphere and warming the planet, and vehicle tailpipe emissions are a major contributor to the problem. So, every alternative form of vehicle propulsion has been thoroughly explored in the last decade and Lithium-Ion batteries are the leading technology for the time being. Tailpipe emissions from the vehicle are eliminated, there’s instant and plentiful torque and the new models are even starting to look cool. But, BEV adoption has lagged below the projections of futurists and will continue to face a number of challenges and headwinds. To put this in perspective, BEVs in the U.S. account for barely 1% of the fleet in 2021. That market share will double to 2% in 2025. By the end of this decade, BEVs will account for 6% of the domestic parc — and the vast majority of those will still be under factory warranty. It won’t be until 2035 that the BEV share rises to double digits. These numbers are from the joint industry report issued at AAPEX and represent the Base Adoption scenario. The numbers could be lower if development and investment lag, or they could be higher under the rosiest of assumptions. A few inconvenient truths about battery-powered vehicles have jumped out at me from my research: 1) Consumers have expressed reluctance to invest in a BEV unless their range-anxiety is satisfactorily addressed, and they can confidently head out on a road trip without the need to plan their itinerary around rest stops at the charging station. Derek Kaufman from Schwartz Advisors told the AASA Vision Conference audience that the government has a goal of investing $5 billion on an additional 500,000 charging stations. That’s great, but the need is for 4X that number. Until the number of charging stations is dramatically increased, depending on a BEV will require changes to driving and consumer behavior. 2) Current battery technology can be charged with standard household current. But, it takes all night, and the full range potential is not achieved. Fast-charging DC stations typically cost 3 to 4 times as much per KWh limiting their use unless absolutely necessary. Brian Daugherty, chief technology officer at MEMA, explained that a typical home consumes 1.2 kilowatts (KW) per hour on average. A direct current (DC) fast charger on the side of the interstate uses 300 KW or the equivalent demand on the grid of 250 homes. Imagine your favorite rest stop equipped with a couple dozen charging stations on Memorial Day weekend with everyone plugged in for a fast charge to get them to the beach. The entire East Coast will go dim. 3) Just as concerning as the infrastructure is the source of the minerals that go into modern batteries. China controls 70-80% of the lithium, cobalt, manganese, nickel and graphite use in electrodes and Russia produces more than 20% of battery-grade nickel. Half of the cobalt is supplied from the Republic of the Congo, with a dismal record of child-labor abuses. But, battery technology is rapidly advancing and professor and inventor John Goodenough, who is credited with inventing the current state-of-the-science Lithium-Ion battery, recently co-developed a rapid-charging, high-cycle, non-flammable glass battery. Years of testing and development are needed to prove the viability of this tech in automotive applications. But, apparently, the 2019 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry did not think Lithium-Ion battery technology was … Good Enough. 4) Finally, it is worth remembering that switching from a gasoline ICE to a BEV that plugs into the electric grid is simply a trade off from tailpipe emissions to smokestack emissions until we have a much higher portion of our electricity supplied from renewable sources (solar, hydro and wind). Even in our current position, battery electric cars generate only 50% of the emissions of a comparable gasoline vehicle, even when battery manufacturing is included in the calculation, according to Cultura.org. With all that said, battery electric vehicles are here to stay, and their share of the market will slowly increase. Costs will come down, range and performance will go up, and the investment of the OEMs and the government will ensure that electrics command a significant share of our transportation system in the future. Internal combustion engines are not facing extinction and will remain relevant to hybrid vehicles, heavy equipment and large SUVs and trucks for many decades. As Kaufman explained, electrics will be the preferred solution for small package delivery fleets, autonomous urban vehicles and fleet-shared transportation solutions. The best thing for an aftermarket parts or service business with an eye on the long game is to take your local Avis, Uber or Waymo executive out to lunch and talk about their need to eliminate underperformed maintenance and deliver 100% up-time with a reliable supply of aftermarket parts. The aftermarket should do what we’ve always done when faced with something new and uncertain, adapt and pay attention. Change is coming faster than ever, but we are Essential — regardless of the propulsion technology. The post link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view. link hidden, please login to view
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