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Latest U.S. Tariffs Could Make Auto Parts Pricier
SHANGHAI—The Trump administration’s latest tariffs will hammer Chinese auto-parts makers, likely raising prices for their U.S. customers, who have few options to buy key parts elsewhere, manufacturers and industry experts say.

The new tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese-made goods, announced Monday and set to take effect next week, are expected to hit a range of auto-related imports—from crankshafts and spark plugs to windshield-wiper blades—and reverberate through the supply chain, potentially impacting the prices of new and used cars alike.

The automotive industry has become so globalized, and Chinese suppliers so dominant at certain points in the supply chain, that there are few immediate and affordable alternatives to China for some materials and parts, industry experts say.

More than 1,000 Chinese companies export auto parts to the U.S., shipping axles, fog lamps, brake rotors and more to U.S. auto companies and parts stores. The U.S. imports about $10 billion in parts from China annually, second only to Mexico’s $23 billion, according to a recent Boston Consulting Group study. The latest round of tariffs will impose a 10% duty effective Sept. 24 and then increase it to 25% by the end of the year.

Those tariffs could increase prices for car owners looking to replace worn-out components—some of which, such as brake rotors, are built mostly in China. A 25% tariff would likely increase the average cost of replacing a set of four brake rotors from $280 currently to nearly $400, which could dissuade some car owners from making needed repairs, according to the Auto Care Association, a lobbying group for independent parts manufacturers, distributors and retailers.
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Karl Rove Joins Keynote Speaker Lineup At AAPEX 2018
Karl Rove, a political strategist best known for his provocative and robust knowledge of the major political issues of the day, will speak at AAPEX 2018 during the grand opening keynote session, “Breakfast with John King and Karl Rove: How Trade and the Elections Could Impact the Aftermarket.”

AAPEX will take place Tuesday, Oct. 30 through Thursday, Nov. 1, at the Sands Expo in Las Vegas. The grand opening keynote session is a ticketed event and will be held from 7-8:45 a.m. PDT on Oct. 30 in The Venetian, Palazzo Ballroom, 5th floor.

During his keynote address, Rove will focus on the global impact of President Donald Trump’s imposed and proposed tariffs, as well as how tariffs potentially levied by foreign countries may impact U.S. businesses.
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Replacing Cabin Air Filters for the Health of It
Cabin air filters may not be the most exciting part of today’s vehicles, but their role in cleaning up the interior air can be vital to your customers’ health.

Air pollution is becoming a bigger concern, even as cars are producing fewer emissions. Since the 1990s, automakers have included cabin air filters as a standard feature on vehicles, to remove dust, pollen, allergens and soot from the air in the interior of the car.

Much like an air filter for your home’s HVAC system, the cabin air filter improves the quality of the air entering the vehicle through the heating and cooling system. It also keeps dirt, debris, bugs and leaves out of the evaporator and heater core.

How often should these filters be changed? That depends on the filter’s service life and operating conditions. However, most manufacturers recommend replacing them once a year.

Cabin air filters are very efficient and can filter up to 100,000 liters of outside air through the vehicle’s interior – which is one reason that it’s a good idea to change these filter elements regularly. Your customers may not even realize they have one of these filters, because it’s not as commonly known as an air filter or oil filter. They sit behind the glovebox or in some other out-of-the-way location where most vehicle owners never see them. And being out of sight can lead to lack of maintenance.
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Indirect Tire-Pressure Monitoring System: The ‘Other’ TPMS
It’s been more than a decade since the federal government first mandated that new vehicles feature tire-pressure monitoring systems to warn drivers against underinflation. Direct TPMS sensors and their service kits are a common stocking item for parts stores, tire shops and even general repair shops nationwide, but while these sensors are now well-known and widely available, there is another system that provides tire-pressure monitoring without sensor service and replacement.

In the case of direct TPMS, radio frequency signals from each tire-mounted sensor are transmitted to a central receiver, where the individual air-pressure readings are compared to the manufacturer’s recommended inflation pressure. If the actual pressure in any tire drops below 75 percent of this recommended calibration, the warning light will illuminate. Some manufacturers also display the actual pressure of each tire in their driver information center (usually found in the gauge cluster) during startup.
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Supreme Court Rules That States Can Charge Online Sellers Sales Tax
Today, the Supreme Court of The United States ruled that states can charge online sellers sales tax even if they don't have a physical presence in their state. For years, online retailers have been able to sell without charging their customers sales tax, which gave them a leg up over traditional brick and mortar stores. This is a big win for retailers that have a store front and could never avoid charging sales tax, it evens the playing field.

How states enact this on a state by state level is still to be determined. Many states today have put into legislation affiliate nexus laws, and the states that haven't will soon change to collect tax revenue. Small online retailers stand to take the most hit on this. From small website sellers to Amazon and eBay marketplace sellers, they'll soon have to charge sales tax. This will affect all kinds of sellers, including those that sell auto parts and don't currently charge sales tax. 
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O’Reilly Auto Parts Signs Multi-Year Partnership Extension with Cordova International Raceway
CORDOVA, Ill. – Cordova International Raceway is proud to announce that O’Reilly Auto Parts has signed a multi-year partnership extension beginning with the 65th annual World Series of Drag Racing August 24-26, 2018 in Cordova, Ill.

O’Reilly Auto Parts, one of the nation’s largest specialty retailers of automotive aftermarket parts, continues its long-standing partnership with the world’s longest continually-running drag racing event and obtains title-rights sponsorship to the iconic event through this multi-year agreement.

The historic event will be known as “The O’Reilly Auto Parts World Series of Drag Racing.”

General admission tickets for The O’Reilly Auto Parts World Series of Drag Racing start at $30 for Friday, $40 Saturday and $15 Sunday. Tickets for children ages 6-12 are $10 for Friday, $10 for Saturday, and $5 Sunday. A three-day “Super Pass” ticket for the entire weekend is $75 for adults and $20 for children 6-12.
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OEM vs. Aftermarket Parts for Your Car: How to Choose
When selecting parts for a car repair, it pays to know the differences between original and aftermarket parts. Whenever possible, get estimates for both.

Choosing between original and aftermarket car parts — and even used parts of either type — is all about squaring your priorities with your budget.

You’ll have different options depending on the part and the shop. And the best choice will depend on whether you’re trying to keep repairs cheap, restore your car’s appearance after a wreck or soup up your ride.

Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts match those that came with your car, and are of the same quality as its original parts. They’re also the most expensive.
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Replacement Intervals For Oil And Air Filters In Today’s Vehicles
The factory-recommended replacement intervals for filters can vary quite a bit depending on the year, make and model of the vehicle, as well as how it is driven. As a rule, older vehicles (those more than 15 to 20 years old) typically have more frequent service intervals than newer vehicles. Why? Because late-model vehicles require less maintenance, thanks to improvements in motor oils, transmission fluids, engine design and filter media.

Many long-life air and oil filters use synthetic fiber media or a blend of cellulose and synthetic fibers to extend filter life.

Changing the oil and filter every 3,000 miles was standard practice decades ago. But it’s no longer necessary because most multi-viscosity oils today are a synthetic blend or a full synthetic that resist viscosity breakdown and oxidation for a much longer period of time. Late-model fuel-injected engines also run much cleaner than their carbureted ancestors, which reduces oil contamination in the crankcase.
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Growth Of Ride-Hailing Services In NYC Fuels Arch Auto Parts’ Business
 Arch Auto Parts, an auto parts supplier in Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island, New York, has reported strong sales of OE-quality parts resulting from explosive growth in rideshare services Uber, Lyft, Juno and Via, and on-demand delivery services. In the past four years, NYC ride-hail app pickups have grown from zero to 15 million trips per month, according to NYC Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC) data, via toddwschneider.com. About half of NYC ride-hail pickups are in the outer boroughs, where taxis have historically been less prevalent. Ride-hail app services now make approximately 10 times more pick-ups than green and yellow taxis combined in the outer boroughs.

The surge in Uber, Lyft and other commercial drivers is good news for Arch Auto Parts, which reports a spike in demand for competitively priced, OE-quality parts. To maintain their TLC license, vehicles used for Uber and Lyft must pass inspections at least every four months, so drivers stay on top of service and repairs and closely track expenses. Arch Auto Parts says it provides these independent contractors in-stock availability of OE-quality parts, at deep discount prices typically only available to commercial fleets.

“Many Uber and Lyft drivers log more than 50,000 miles per year, so they quickly reach their vehicle manufacturer’s warranty limit. They still want OE-quality parts, but without the high dealer prices,” said Lucy Henner, Arch Auto Parts vice president of marketing. “These high-mileage drivers are opting for high-quality parts not only for better performance, but also to reduce their total service expenses. Labor charges are the biggest component of most repair bills. They don’t want to pay labor charges to service the car twice, when an OE-quality part will often last twice as long.”
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Icahn selling auto parts maker Federal Mogul to Tenneco for $5.4 billion
Auto parts maker Tenneco is buying Federal-Mogul from Carl Icahn's Icahn Enterprises in a deal worth $5.4 billion in cash and stock.

Tenneco will then separate the combined companies into two separate stocks in a tax-free spinoff, one focusing on "aftermarket and ride performance," the other on "powertrain technology."

"We expect to be meaningful stockholders of Tenneco going forward and are excited about the prospects for additional value creation," Icahn said in a statement. "This transaction is an excellent example of our general modus operandi at Icahn Enterprises, by which we seek to acquire undervalued assets, nurture, guide and improve their condition and operations, and ultimately develop them into more valuable businesses, which greatly enhances value for all shareholders."

Icahn acquired control of Federal Mogul, a maker of wiper blades and spark plugs, in 2008. The activist investor then took it private in January 2017.

Tenneco shares jumped more than 6 percent in premarket trading Tuesday.

The sale to Icahn, made up of $800 million in cash and 29.5 million shares of Tenneco stock, is expected to close in the second half of the year.

Source: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/10/icahn-selling-federal-mogul-to-tenneco-for-5-point-4-billion.html
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Oil Filters And Air Filters: Important Maintenance Parts
Air filters, cabin air filters, oil filters and (sometimes) fuel and transmission filters are important maintenance parts that typically are replaced according to a time and/or mileage schedule. A vehicle’s service schedule recommendations can be found in the owner’s manual or in a separate brochure. Unfortunately, many motorists never read – or totally ignore – the recommendations.

Factory service schedules are designed to prolong the life of the engine, transmission and cooling system, to reduce premature wear and breakdowns, but also to minimize maintenance costs while the vehicle is still under warranty. That’s why factory oil change recommendations have been stretched to 7,500 to 10,000 miles or more on many late-model vehicles. Most late-model cars and light trucks no longer have recommended change intervals for transmission fluid and filters, or for fuel filters. These so-called “lifetime” fluids and filters are supposed to last a long time – but they won’t last forever. Experience has shown that “lifetime” filters and fluids don’t live up to the hype.

Fuel filters always should be replaced when a fuel pump is replaced (unless the filter is part of the fuel pump module assembly). Likewise, transmission filters should be replaced if a customer is changing the fluid in their transmission.

Last Line of Defense Against Contaminants

Filters are the first line of defense against contaminants. Air filters keep dirt and abrasive particles out of the engine. A good-quality air filter will trap about 98 percent or more of the particles that can cause trouble inside an engine. As the filter media becomes saturated with dirt, it’s efficiency actually increases. But, as the filter becomes clogged with more and more dirt, it also becomes more restrictive to airflow. The greater the pressure drop across the filter, the more it hurts performance and fuel economy.
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Coolant Sealers Can Save Thousands Of Dollars
One of the best money-saving products that’s ever been invented is cooling system sealer. Most products will successfully seal minor coolant leaks to stop the loss of coolant that leads to engine overheating. Specially formulated “head gasket” sealers also can stop many head gasket leaks and save your customer thousands of dollars in expensive engine repairs. What’s more, coolant sealers also can be added to the coolant as a preventive measure to plug small leaks before they turn into big ones.

Coolant leaks can occur anywhere in the cooling system, including the water pump, hoses, radiator, heater core, thermostat housing, expansion plugs, head gasket, combustion chamber or cylinder block. Regardless of where a leak occurs, the end result is always the same: coolant loss that sooner or later allows the engine to overheat.

Overheating is bad news because excessive heat causes metal to expand beyond normal limits and clearances. The result can be piston scuffing, cylinder scoring, valve sticking, damaged valve guides and even warped cylinder heads. Overheating also can crush an otherwise good head gasket, causing the gasket to leak when the radiator is refilled with coolant.

Most cooling system sealers can seal small pinhole leaks in radiators and heater cores as well as hairline cracks where the core and end tanks are joined, and porosity leaks in aluminum cylinder heads and blocks. Products designed to seal more serious leaks also can delay or even eliminate the need to replace a head gasket or heater core (both of which are expensive labor-intensive repair jobs). Stopping a water pump shaft seal leak, however, or a large leak in a hose is beyond the capabilities of most products.
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