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Freon/refrigerant in a can questions

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Has anyone used and can recommend the best R134 freon in a can to use? Does it make much of a difference really? These are the ones that I am looking at:

EZ Chill Refill Refrigerant 
Arctic Freeze Ready-To-Use 
AC Pro Professional Formula Refrigerant

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R-134a is the exact same thing as freon. They were required to change the name, and  few "ingredients" because of the EPA.

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Thanks for joining @MCT !

After you posted this I had to take a look at the wiki on this because I don't know myself. I always thought freon was R22, R134, and the newer R1234yf. Even a shorter word for "refrigerant" but come to find out its a registered trademark for The Chemours Company as a brand (spin-off from DuPont). Interesting read:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemours

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