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Can anyone identify this o2 sensor?


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    • By Counterman
      One of the more difficult things about any technology is all the new terms you seem to get hit with, and in the automotive world, CAN bus was one of those terms. The second half, “bus,” was a term we had already used for many years, primarily as “bus bar.” A bus bar was a metal strip or bar that distributed power among multiple components.
      In the automotive world, even when fiber-optic turn-signal indicators mounted on the front of a fender were as high-tech as it got, bus bars were inside many components such as fuse panels and relays, and sometimes under the hood for various engine electronics.
      Then computer electronics took over. At first, we just had one electronic control unit (ECU) to deal with, and it was for the engine. Before you knew it, there was a transmission control unit, then the ABS control unit (not necessarily in that order). Wiring harnesses got bigger … and bigger and bigger.
      Today, a car can have as many as 150 ECUs. In addition to the familiar engine, transmission, brake and airbag control units, doors, seats, mirrors, power steering, audio systems, cruise control, batteries and charging management systems all have their own control units. And as you can imagine, that’s just scratching the surface.
      As technology was taking a ride with all these systems, engineers realized there were too many wires and too many sensors. There was no choice but to get aboard the CAN bus. CAN stands for controller area network, and a CAN bus, simply put, is a common communication line that can be used by all ECUs on the network.
      The various control units on a modern vehicle need to communicate and share information over this network. Here’s an example of how and why. Years ago, when you turned on the air conditioning, a simple switch sent power to the compressor clutch. Today, the HVAC control module may need to communicate with the body control module (BCM) to notify it that A/C has been requested.
      The BCM in turn sends a request to the engine control module (ECM) to “ask permission” if it can energize the A/C-compressor relay. The ECM looks at current engine operating parameters and sends a response signal to the BCM, which, in turn, sends a signal to the A/C relay.
      The technological features on today’s cars are nothing short of impressive. Advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) include features such as adaptive cruise control, forward collision warnings, high-beam safety, lane-departure warnings, traffic-signal recognition, lane-keep assistance, automatic emergency braking and traction control.
      All of the associated control units are in constant communication with each other, and since many of them must utilize information from the same sensors, through the CAN bus network this is possible. Instead of an ambient-temperature sensor for the ECM, the HVAC control unit and the instrument cluster, one sensor can share its data over the network.
      Some high-end vehicles have a feature called automatic brake wiping, or brake disc wiping. This feature utilizes information from a rain sensor (also used by automatic windshield wipers) that’s sent over the CAN bus to the ABS control unit. In programmed intervals, the ABS control unit lightly applies the brakes in a manner that the driver won’t notice, to clear water and moisture away from the rotors and provide maximum braking when needed. All of this is only possible thanks to the communication available over the CAN bus.
      Developing the CAN bus system was no simple feat, and it took many years to complete. The requirements for automotive CAN bus communication are standardized as part of the OBD II vehicle communication standard. There have been many changes over the years related to CAN communication, primarily affecting the speed and manner in which data is transmitted. The easiest way to think about it is to relate it to the changes over the years in USB design we’re all familiar with. It’s for the same reason. They transmit data quicker.
      From a service standpoint, technicians have had to become familiar with CAN bus systems. U-codes that indicate a loss of communication between modules or on a specific bus are a tool designed to help technicians diagnose CAN bus problems.
      Electrical wiring diagrams reflect the CAN bus network, and there are three different types of networks – loop, star and loop/star hybrid – referred to as CAN bus topology. Being able to recognize the type of topology can help a technician diagnose CAN bus errors quicker. In today’s world, we all have to get aboard the CAN bus.
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    • By Mighty Auto Parts
      The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view. Vehicles today incorporate a maze of electronic components that must be considered when troubleshooting a performance related symptom. A vast arsenal of test equipment is necessary to communicate with the electronic systems and components. Systems are so connected that it is difficult for the technician to distinguish between a mechanical, electrical, fuel or emission related […]
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    • By Alan
      To Importers in the Global Tire Industry:

      Please read this  as it might inspire you. Many international friends have been perplexed about how to import tires manufactured in China and sell them in their home countries. China's tire industry has experienced rapid growth over the past decade, marking a period of significant dividends. Many early investments in large factories have yielded substantial returns. However, with an increasing number of factories and brands, the competition has intensified. For those who wish to enter this industry but are unsure about how to proceed, please follow my website. I will periodically update it with information about China's tire industry for your reference. 
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      Looking for the Best Lubricants in Birmingham? 
       
      Hey everyone! 👋 I'm on the lookout for the highest quality lubricants in Birmingham. Whether it's for automotive, industrial, or machinery use, finding the right lubrication products is key to ensuring smooth operations and durability.
       
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    • By Counterman
      Bartec TPMS announced the release of its next-generation Rite-Sensor, the RS-2000. 
      “First and foremost, to ensure a smooth transition for our customers, the second-generation Rite-Sensor was designed to be completely backward-compatible with the first-generation version,” Bartec TPMS Product Manager Matthew Hitchcock said. “The second generation will allow us to continue our progress towards 100% vehicle coverage.”
      “The RS-2000 was designed to work on vehicles with high-line TPMS – that is vehicles with wheel-arch initiators,” Bartec CEO Scot Holloway said. “This new design also means improved sensor performance, and future diagnostics, all aimed at making our customers more successful servicing TPMS vehicles.”
      Launched in September, the new Rite-Sensor is available now through authorized resellers.
      To activate the additional vehicle coverage, users of the following Bartec TPMS Tools – the Tech600pro, Tech550Pro, Tech450 Pro or TechRITEPro – need to download and install update 6.0. Users of the Tech500Pro, Tech400Pro and Tech300Pro need to get update 66.0. 
      As always, all tool updates are available (with a current account) at
      link hidden, please login to view, or by using the TPMS Desktop. To learn more about the new Rite-Sensor and other Bartec technology, visit the Bartec booth (41057) at this year’s SEMA Show.
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