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Cell Phone Car Mounts - What do you use?


chevyguy
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Starting this topic because I'd like to see what everyone is using. I'm currently using 

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which I picked up from Amazon and it works pretty good. I previously had a 
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Holder from Amazon that did not hold up well and I had to return it. They sent me a new one though because I had issues with it and refunded me. Both were under $10.

I'm also looking at these magnetic holder which seem very nice, specifically

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.

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What is everyone using?

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DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

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    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


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