Quantcast
Jump to content
  • Welcome to Auto Parts Forum

    Whether you are a veteran automotive parts guru or just someone looking for some quick auto parts advice, register today and start a new topic in our forum. Registration is free and you can even sign up with social network platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Google, and LinkedIn. 

     

the battery boiled out ?what to do!?


Recommended Posts

If they boiled out, you almost certainly did damage; how serious depends on luck. Sometimes batteries can partially recover but you definitely reduced their capacity - how much can be best determined by load-testing. Alternatively, you can get an idea by checking sp gravity once recharged but that isn't as conclusive.

Absolutely check each cell with a hydrometer as one bad cell, which is almost inevitable in this scenario, will kill the entire bank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Similar Content

  • Similar Topics

    • By NAPA
      Why Do Car Batteries Die in the Cold?
      It happens every year: the days get shorter, the nights get longer and we bundle up and prepare for the long, cold months ahead. When it comes to automotive issues, winter is sometimes an especially challenging time. When the mercury drops, it can
      link hidden, please login to view on the complex systems and parts under the hood of your vehicle. If you drive a car, truck or SUV with a traditional internal combustion engine, the battery in your ride is particularly vulnerable in lower temperatures.  Most vehicle batteries are 12-volts, and they consist of six cells. Each cell houses two plates—one made of lead, the other of lead dioxide. The plates are submerged in sulfuric acid, which acts as a catalyst, causing a chemical reaction between the plates producing about two volts of energy per cell. With six cells, you get twelve volts of power. 
      Your battery may start acting up when the temperature drops, so check out these
      link hidden, please login to view. The chemicals inside the battery move slower at lower temperatures, putting stress on the battery and making it difficult to provide sufficient starting power to your vehicle. If you park your vehicle outdoors, you may notice a significant decrease in battery power if the temperature dips below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, especially if your battery is older than three years and you don’t plan on starting your vehicle for several days or weeks at a time.  Let’s face it: vehicle batteries are expensive, and the added stress of cold temperatures can shorten their lifespan. To prolong battery life and save cash, it’s a good idea to invest in a
      link hidden, please login to view or disconnect and safely store your vehicle battery indoors. Car battery winter storage is also a great way to maintain the units of your favorite outdoor toys, such as boats, ATVs or link hidden, please login to view. Let the experts at the NAPA Network help you save money and get the most out of your vehicle battery by safely disconnecting and storing it this winter.  Disconnecting a Car Battery for Storage
      So, you decided to disconnect your car battery for storage this winter. Great idea! Troubleshooting battery problems in cold weather is a headache, but it can also lessen the overall life of your battery, costing you a lot of money in the long run. If you park your vehicle outdoors or in a garage with minimal insulation, it’s a good idea to remove and store the vehicle battery if you don’t plan on driving it more than once every two weeks during the winter. 
      First, you need to safely disconnect your vehicle’s battery. Before you begin, make sure you’re using
      link hidden, please login to view and insulated link hidden, please login to view. You’ll also need a link hidden, please login to view that fits the bolts of your battery—your owner’s manual should have this information available. Turn off your vehicle. Never attempt to disconnect your battery with the engine running.  With the engine off, locate the terminals of your vehicle battery. They may have black and red caps on them, black for negative and red for positive. The negative terminal is labeled with a negative symbol and the positive terminal is labeled with a positive symbol. Remove the plastic caps and locate the negative terminal. Using the wrench, loosen the nut and bolt, then remove the connector cable from the terminal. Repeat this process with the positive terminal.  Now you’re ready to safely remove and store your battery! 
      Car Battery Storage for Winter link hidden, please login to view
      The battery is a vital component of your vehicle, but it is also sometimes a volatile one. The chemicals that provide the crucial reaction that powers your vehicle and its systems are extremely caustic and dangerous. Neglecting proper car battery storage for winter can cause significant damage to your battery and anything nearby, so let NAPA Auto Parts help you plan for properly storing your battery. 
      Before you store it, take the time to carefully clean any
      link hidden, please login to view and out of the battery tray. Ideally, you should store your battery indoors in a dry, temperature-controlled area like a closet or utility pantry. Always store your battery in a link hidden, please login to view and keep it on a low shelf above the cold cement floors or carpets to avoid static discharges. If you’re storing your battery in an area with minimal temperature control like a garage or shed, equip the space with link hidden, please login to view to ensure the battery storage box stays level and away from any moisture that might collect on the ground. Never store a vehicle battery on a high shelf above your head. Make sure to routinely check the batteries while in storage to ensure no fluids are leaking and top off any fluids that have evaporated. While some drivers want to disconnect and store their vehicle batteries, others may not have the time or a good space to store them. Fortunately, NAPA Auto Parts offers a great selection of battery maintainers, battery conditioners and trickle chargers. These low-profile devices not only charge and maintain your vehicle battery while not in use, but they also help break down any buildup of sulfur crystals on the plates. 
      Don’t let Old Man Winter’s plummeting temperatures send your battery to an early grave! Shop NAPA Auto Parts for car battery winter storage solutions. Now you can choose to stay out of the cold and take advantage of our
      link hidden, please login to view. After you checkout online, select “Deliver From Store” and add your delivery address (must reside within 5 miles of the servicing NAPA Store). The store will notify you when your order is out for delivery, it’s that simple!  Photo courtesy of
      link hidden, please login to view. The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By NAPA
      If you drive a vehicle with an internal combustion engine, you can think of the battery like your vehicle’s beating heart. The battery cables act like arteries running a current to the alternator, which powers electronic systems such as the ignition system, the ECM (Electronic Control Module) and the lighting system.
      Bad Battery Cable Symptoms
      Just like in other areas of your vehicle, the components of your battery system will wear out and fail over time. Symptoms of worn or frayed battery cables are like that of a dying battery:
      Dimming or flickering of interior lights or headlights Engine hesitation when starting Clicking noises If you notice a buildup of flaky white or blue crust around the top or sides of your battery, that’s corrosion. It’s a common problem caused by small amounts of escaping hydrogen gas or leaking electrolytes on the top of your battery or the battery cable terminals. Corrosion can develop on older batteries that were overcharged, undercharged or exposed to certain environmental factors.
      The NAPA Network can show you how to replace battery cables in your car, as well as
      link hidden, please login to view, your link hidden, please login to view, your link hidden, please login to view and—depending on the extent of the damage—your battery tray and link hidden, please login to view. If you determine your battery has good voltage by using a link hidden, please login to view and doesn’t need replacing, then it’s time to check your link hidden, please login to view. Start at the cable terminals attached to the battery posts. Inspect both the positive and negative cables for fraying, knicks and splits. If you see anything that doesn’t look right, it’s time to replace the cables.
      Replacing Battery Cables
      Just like any good at-home automotive repair, you should start with all your tools ready to go, as well as safety equipment such as
      link hidden, please login to view and link hidden, please login to view. Replacing battery cables is straightforward, and you’ll need the following: link hidden, please login to view A Socket Wrench link hidden, please login to view link hidden, please login to view Step 1 – Using the screwdriver or socket wrench, gently disconnect the battery terminals from the battery posts—starting with the negative cable—then disconnect the positive to avoid shorting and potential danger. Trace the path of the negative cable to the chassis, then trace the positive cable to the fuse box. Make sure to take a picture or otherwise note the course so you can route the new cables correctly.
      Step 2 – Use the ratchet to loosen the negative ground nut, then remove the nut that holds the positive cable to the fuse block. Inspect these for corrosion and damage and replace them if the metal is soft or the threading is deteriorated. Inspect the terminal posts on top of the battery and use a
      link hidden, please login to view to remove any corrosion. Step 3 – Install the new cables starting with the negative. Reattach the negative ground nut to the chassis and the nut that holds the positive cable to the fuse block. Make sure the nuts are tight and snug.
      Step 4 – Route the cables the way you originally found them and connect the terminal ends to the clean battery posts starting with the positive cable, then the negative cable.
      Step 5 – Start your vehicle and ensure the electrical systems work properly.
      Removing corrosion, cleaning your battery terminals and replacing worn battery cables is a part of routine vehicle battery maintenance that most at-home mechanics can do. However, this job involves the electrical system of your vehicle, so if you don’t feel comfortable doing the replacement yourself or can’t find the time, we are here to help. Just find a friendly local
      link hidden, please login to view near you, and one of our ASE-certified technicians will replace the battery cables in your vehicle for you. We can even help you with an link hidden, please login to view to help you budget for your repairs and get you back on the road in no time! Photo courtesy of
      link hidden, please login to view The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By NAPA
      It should come as no surprise that car batteries not only come in all shapes and sizes, but also in various electrical capacities. This makes sense because the wide variety of vehicle sizes and types in use make it unlikely that a single battery can serve every application. But does car battery size matter? And what if you are wondering what size battery for my car is best? Let’s take a look at why car batteries are different sizes and what car battery sizes you might find under the hood of most cars, trucks, SUVs and vans.
      Why Are Car Batteries Different Sizes?
      The very earliest cars used batteries of various sizes with no standards whatsoever. Battery manufacturers simply made batteries the way they wanted and car makers picked whatever fit. But then the Battery Council International (BCI) was formed and battery sizes started to fall in line with the standards set forth by the BCI. This helped simplify and standardize automotive engineering designs with common battery tray sizes as well as power output measurements.
      Common Car Battery Sizes
      Over the years car manufacturers figured out it was easier to just stick to a few common battery sizes to use across their production lines. The car battery size chart below lists out the dimensions of the most common car battery sizes:
      GROUP NO. NAPA PART NO.
      LENGTH (inches) WIDTH (inches) HEIGHT (inches) 24 8424 10-3/4 6-3/4 9 24F 8424F 10-3/4 6-3/4 9 25 8425 9-3/4 6-7/8 8-7/8 27 8427 12 6-3/4 9 34 8434 10-3/4 6-7/8 8 34R 8434R 10-3/4 6-7/8 8 35 8435 9-9/16 6-7/8 8-7/8 41 (T65) 8441 11-9/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 42/58R 8442 10 7-1/4 6-7/8 47 (H5/L2) 8447 9-9/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 48 (H6/L3) 8448 11 6-7/8 7-1/2 49 (H8/L5) 8449 13-15/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 55 8456 8-3/4 6 8-1/2 58 8458 10 7-1/4 6-7/8 65 8465 12 7-3/8 7-5/8 75 8475 9-3/4 7 7-1/4 78 8478 10-3/4 6-7/8 7-1/4 86 8486 9 6-7/8 8-1/8 96R 8496R 9-9/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 99R (T4) 8499R 8-1/4 6-7/8 6-7/8 75/86 (DT) 8425/75 9-3/4 7 8-1/8 34/78 (DT) 8434/78 10-3/4 6-7/8 8 That may look like a long list of car battery sizes, but there are actually many more in use around the world. A more inclusive battery size chart for cars, trucks, SUVs and other vehicles can be found in the
      link hidden, please login to view. Size Isn’t The Only Factor link hidden, please login to view
      Looking at the above car battery sizes chart you may notice that some batteries are physically the same size, but that doesn’t mean they are interchangeable. The location of the positive and negative battery terminals, the battery case mounting provisions, and the type of battery terminal connections are all important factors.
      There are also differences in battery capacity. The cranking amp (CA) capacity and cold cranking amp (CCA) capacity are both important factors in matching a battery with a vehicle’s needs. The CA and CCA both refer to the amount of amps available to start the vehicle at a certain temperature. Then there is the reserve capacity (RC) of the battery which is how long a battery can deliver 25 amps of power until it is drained down to 10.5 volts. 
      What Is The Right Battery Size For My Car?
      If you are trying to find the right battery size for your car then the answer is the size that your vehicle’s manufacturer designed it to use. Trying to shoehorn in a bigger battery may sound like a good idea, but if the battery mount can’t hold it securely then you may end up with a big headache. Likewise picking a smaller battery than specified could lead to electrical issues if it can’t handle the electrical load. It may also rattle around in the battery tray leading to a shorter battery life or even a dangerous short circuit. And even if the car battery group size chart says a battery physically fits, it may be the wrong capacity or voltage. Trust the engineers that designed the vehicle and only replace the battery with an exact size unit. You can change your car battery yourself if you have the
      link hidden, please login to view, or let the experts at your link hidden, please login to view handle it for you. The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By Counterman
      Continental has expanded its line of hybrid-battery cooling fans to provide coverage for some of the most popular hybrid models on the road today.
      The growing line now delivers direct-replacement fans for Ford, GM, Honda, Hyundai, KIA and Toyota hybrid models from 2003 to 2021.
      “As the average age of hybrid vehicles on the road continues to climb, it is very important that the ‘air-cooled’ technology used to keep the battery and battery cells properly cooled continues to operate to OE specifications,” said Christina Bergstrom, Continental senior product manager. “That is why we have continued to expand our hybrid-battery cooling fan coverage to popular model years of the Buick LaCrosse, Chevrolet Impala and Volt, Ford C-Max and Fusion, Honda Civic, Hyundai Sonata, Kia Optima, Toyota Camry and Prius, and more. The battery packs on these vehicles can begin to weaken after only five years of service and the cooling fans may need to be replaced in the seventh and eighth year in order to maintain required cooling performance.”
      Designed as an exact replacement for the original fan, Continental hybrid-battery cooling fans restore the original battery cooling performance to the vehicle. Ensuring that the fan is properly functioning is critical to maintaining the health of the battery and the vehicle’s overall fuel economy. The fans feature an OE design, including identical mounting locations and plug-and-play electrical connections, that helps ensure an easy installation.
      For more information, visit
      link hidden, please login to view or contact [email protected] The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • eManualonline.com - Save 5% OFF on orders Over $50, Use Code Blaze. Ends 12/31/22.
    • By OReilly Auto Parts
      How To: Choose the Best Car Battery
×
  • Create New...