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Hi ‘ my name is Emanuel and i bought an engine for Italy but unfortunately was not compatible and returned in excellent condition!!! They took 30% from money for handling !!  Is this the normal to have this What I can do to  recover all my money!!!

 

kind regards 

Emanuel 

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3 hours ago, Emanuel said:

Hi ‘ my name is Emanuel and i bought an engine for Italy but unfortunately was not compatible and returned in excellent condition!!! They took 30% from money for handling !!  Is this the normal to have this What I can do to  recover all my money!!!

 

kind regards 

Emanuel 

Probably a restocking fee. Read the fine print.

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