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Sell Used Catalytic Converters


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If you're looking to make some extra money selling your used catalytic converters, then you should check out https://scrapcatalytics.com

We pay top dollar for your used catalytic converters across the US. We have both pickup and shipping options. We work with smaller sellers to scrap yards selling hundreds of cats a month. Feel free to reach out for a price check so you can compare Scrap Catalytics to your current buyer.

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  • 11 months later...

I remember that some of my friends were starting to sell used catalytic converters. They told me that it is very profitable, around 500-600$ for one piece. I was very interested in making some cash because I had an old Cadillac in my backyard. But, I found an offer on

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. It was more attractive than my friend's one. I got the money very fast in my bank account. Also, the next day two guys came and took it away from me. In this way, I saved a lot of time, made some money, and got rid of something old.

Edited by Blaksher
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I heard that your company is paying quite a little money for a catalytic converter. I am telling you that because I know companies like

link hidden, please login to view
can pay you two times a lot of money for the same product. So why don't you check it out by yourself. I nearly sold a converter to you, but happily, one of my friends told me about scrapi and made me change my mind.

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