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What Happens When The Catalytic Converter Goes Bad?


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converts harmful substances in automobile exhaust into less harmful substances through chemical reaction. For example, it can convert carbon monoxide, nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbons into carbon dioxide and water vapor, etc.

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Why is catalytic converter matter?

The catalytic converter belongs to the exhaust system of the vehicle. During use, they may be contaminated, blocked, or physically damaged, which will lead to poor engine performance, and in severe cases, the engine will stop.

What can cause damage to the catalytic converter?

Some pollutants can damage the catalytic converter, such as lead-containing gas, engine coolant and engine oil, among which the engine coolant can leak into the combustion system due to the failure of the cylinder head gasket. These liquids can clog the catalytic converter, thereby restricting the passage of exhaust gas.

If the spark plug does not ignite or the exhaust valve is leaking, there is too much unburned gas, and the catalytic converter may overheat.

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What happens when the catalytic converter goes bad?

  1. Engine performance is slow
  2. The exhausted gas is black smoke with the smell of sulfur or rotten eggs
  3. The underside of the car is overheated

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How to mainitain catalytic converter?

  1. Maintain your vehicleregularly.
  2. Keep your exhaust, emission and combustion systems in good condition, which can effectively reduce the probability of catalytic converter damage
  3. Check the engine lights regularly.
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    • By Counterman
      Electric vehicles. E-commerce. Vehicle complexity. Consolidation. Autonomous Driving. Connectivity. How will these and other trends affect the automotive aftermarket over the next decade, and more importantly, how should aftermarket suppliers respond?
      A new study – “The U.S. Automotive Aftermarket in 2035” – attempts to answer these questions, with aftermarket suppliers “facing more inflection points than we ever have before,” in the words of Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association (AASA) President and CEO Paul McCarthy.
      “And the reality is we can’t handle them all,” McCarthy said at the 2022 AASA Vision Conference in Dearborn, Michigan. “So we need to understand which ones are really going to disrupt us and which ones may matter less. Because if there’s one thing we know, the aftermarket in 2035 is not going to look like the aftermarket today.”
      Conducted by the management consulting firm
      link hidden, please login to view, the study looks at the current and future states of the automotive aftermarket. One of the most alarming conclusions from the study is that aftermarket suppliers aren’t ready to deal with nine high-impact trends: BEV (battery-electric-vehicle) penetration; e-commerce and o2o (online-to-offline); consolidation; labor shortages; supply chain disruption; data access; autonomous driving; supply chain footprint; and sustainability. Barry Neal, senior partner at Roland Berger, and Neury Freitas, principal at Roland Berger, presented an overview of the study findings at the AASA Vision Conference. Here are some of the highlights.
      Battery Electric Vehicles
      How much and how soon will BEVs affect the independent aftermarket? That all depends on which part of the market you serve.
      By 2035, the study projects that only 2% of 12-year-old vehicles and older will be electric, while 11% of 8- to 11-year-old vehicles will be electric. However, the impact of BEVs will be more pronounced in newer vehicles, with 32% of 0- to 3-year-old vehicles expected to be electric.
      “The more you are dependent on the OES or OEM channel, the more or sooner EVs will actually impact your business,” Freitas explained.
      At 100,000 miles, BEVs require 50% fewer service visits than internal-combustion vehicles, based on OEM service recommendations. By 200,000 miles, that gaps shrinks slightly to 47%.
      “There clearly are services that will disappear in an EV,” Freitas said. “Anything that’s related to the engine, anything that’s related to combustion will go away.”
      BEVs will need battery coolant, but due to regenerative braking, brake systems typically last longer on electric vehicles.
      “The tire players are really happy,” Freitas added. “They are waiting for EVs, because either you have a heavier vehicle that needs a stronger structure of the tire, therefore they’re more expensive, or if you use a normal tire, that’s going to wear faster. So, that’s a positive.”
      Online-to-Offline Business Model
      The pandemic has accelerated the growth of o2o in the automotive aftermarket, as more consumers embraced buying parts and booking appointments via their mobile devices. The linkage between the offline and online worlds “brings a lot of benefits and a lot of convenience for consumers,” Freitas asserted.
      The increased convenience for consumers, and the cost savings along the value chain, will continue to drive the growth of o2o in two phases: parts efficiency, as proactive diagnostics and digital parts/service selection and scheduling enable a lower cost structure; and labor efficiency, as advanced booking/scheduling and predictive maintenance improve labor utilization and throughput.  
      “If you get the higher convenience for consumers, together with the potential cost savings, at a first step, if you know which parts will be needed and where they’ll be needed before they are actually needed, you can cut a few steps [from] the value chain and in the supply chain, and you can actually save some real money, as you don’t need hot-shot [delivery], for example,” Freitas explained. “And then in a second step, once we get to a large enough critical mass, and the shops are able to schedule similar services back to back, we might get some efficiencies from the technicians as well.”
      Consolidation
      According to Roland Berger, the United States is leading the way in terms of consolidation, with the top 10 distributors in the U.S. independent automotive aftermarket (IAM) commanding 75% to 80% of the total market share. Europe is a distant second, at 30% to 35%, while China is at 5% to 10%.
      Roland Berger sees more consolidation ahead for parts suppliers and service providers (mechanical and collision). Going forward, there won’t be as many opportunities for large retailers to acquire distributors, Freitas asserted.    
      “Therefore, if one of those big companies has a hiccup over the next 12, 13 years, we see as a chance of two of those top four or five players actually merging and becoming an even larger player,” Freitas added.
      Labor Availability
      Looking at the big picture, U.S. unemployment rates were at historic lows in the years leading up to the COVID-19 pandemic. When the pandemic escalated in early 2020, it skyrocketed. Since then, the unemployment rate has been declining steadily. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in March dropped to 3.6%.
      Neal and Freitas showed two charts that don’t bode well for the future of the IAM. One chart showed a steady decline in the number of students completing postsecondary degrees for automotive repair since 2010. The other chart showed the imbalance between the supply and demand of technicians since 2010. While the technician shortage is nothing new, the gap between supply and demand is projected to widen in 2025 and beyond.
      Freitas concluded: “If the industry does not really get organized, we don’t think this problem is going to get solved anytime soon.”
      Supply Chain
      The headline here is that China appears to be losing its cost advantage – even without tariffs.
      For the past decade or so, if you wanted to manufacture products on the cheap, China was the obvious destination. However, when you factor in the rising costs of outbound freight, raw materials, manual labor and other variables, China will lose its cost advantage to Mexico as soon as this year. By 2035, due to the projected increase in China’s labor costs, it will be significantly cheaper to manufacture goods in Mexico compared to China, according to Roland Berger.
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      Data Access
      By 2035, nearly 100% of new vehicles sold in the United States will be connected, meaning they’ll have the capability to receive and transmit information. Extrapolated to the total U.S. vehicle parc, 66% of vehicles will be connected.
      How we get to that point – and how it will affect the IAM – is less certain. Currently, the automakers control most of the data generated by vehicles, which is bad for consumers, bad for IAM suppliers and good for the OEMs. In the medium term, Roland Berger anticipates a shift to open APIs (application programming interfaces) and “mixed control” of vehicle data.
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      Action Steps
      In light of the study’s findings, Neal and Freitas outlined a number of potential steps that IAM suppliers could take.
      “In terms of individual responsibilities, there’s the importance of reviewing the portfolio and product strategy,” Neal said. “As you look at the influx of new technologies, both in terms of electronics, battery-electric vehicles, ADAS and autonomous, how are you adjusting your portfolio to adapt to those and what is the strategy you have, whether that be a last-man-standing strategy or looking for a third leg in terms of other opportunities, or the development of an EV strategy to attack some of the new opportunities that are coming out?”
      Regarding the technician shortage, Neal also emphasized the importance of supporting trade schools “as well as supporting of advocacy at the high school and the middle school level for robotics programs and mechanical programs to ensure the interest of that technician force of the future, as well as an industry-level support for new entrants and opportunities, supporting aspects such as augmented reality and remote support for technicians in the field to allow some of those newer solutions to support a broader labor force in the future in terms of the capability set in technology.”
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    • By Counterman
      When I hear good and bad in the same sentence, I think of the classic Clint Eastwood movie, “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.”
      This isn’t the Old West, but I can draw a perfect parallel between the title and the fight we sometimes have with alternators.
      When they’re good, they’re good. When they’re bad, they’re bad. So, what’s the ugly? That’s when they’re good, but we think they’re bad because there’s an electrical problem that prevents them from working properly. It gets even uglier when the problem is hard to find, and probably the ugliest when a good alternator is called bad.
      What an alternator does is simple, or at least we’ll keep it that way for now. It outputs direct current (DC) to power vehicle electrical systems and maintain and recharge the vehicle battery. An alternator is aptly named because it generates an alternating current (AC), which is, in turn, converted to DC.
      We can divide the alternator into two different systems: the mechanical and the electrical. On the electrical side, you have the components that are responsible for generating and managing the electrical current, which include the rotor, stator, regulator and rectifier. The rotor and stator are the main components that generate electricity, based on fundamental electromagnetic principals. The regulator is what controls the output of the alternator, and the rectifier is what converts AC to DC.
      The Good
      When an alternator is good, alternating current is being generated by the rotor and stator, the rectifier is converting it to direct current and the regulator is controlling the output. If a problem develops with one of these, the result is either no voltage, too much voltage or an AC-voltage output. Any of those are bad.
      If this seems too simple, it is on purpose. We can get much deeper into it, which will make it more difficult, but the way we do things today has changed the process of diagnosing the charging system. Things were different years ago. We used to take alternators apart. We’d check the windings of the rotor and stator. Then we’d check the diodes in the rectifier, and finally check the regulator. As a matter of fact, regulators used to be separate from the alternator and they were mechanical devices compared to solid-state electronics. We’d take everything apart, check it all, determine what was bad and replace only what was needed.
      We don’t do that anymore. Alternators have been self-contained for many years. Regulators are built in. If an alternator isn’t working, we replace it. That’s it. We don’t think about why, nor do we even toy with the idea of taking it apart. Just send me a new one.
      On the mechanical side, you have the bearings that support the rotor, and the pulley that’s driven by the belt. If the bearings are bad, they’re loose or noisy. Pulleys used to be fixed chunks of metal. Now we see overrunning alternator pulleys (OAP) or overrunning alternator decouplers (OAD). When these go bad, they’re often noisy, or they may not spin the alternator.
      The brushes in an alternator are another mechanical part of it. They’re made of conductive materials that physically contact and rub against the slip rings. This is how the electrical current from the regulator flows into the rotor. But we don’t replace brushes anymore, nor do we replace bearings. We don’t even think about taking the alternator apart. We just replace it. The pulleys are the only parts we may replace separately.
      The Ugly
      When an alternator needs replaced, the process usually isn’t too difficult, but that’s when it can get ugly.
      As counter professionals, you deal with technicians, and you deal with do-it-yourselfers. Either way, when they ask for an alternator, you’re hoping the diagnosis is correct. The last thing you want is an alternator return. You might ask a few questions to see if they’ve done some basic diagnosis, but you’re in a tough spot. You don’t want to show disrespect, but you don’t want the original coming back covered in grease, because they found the “real” problem after they replaced it and it didn’t fix the problem.
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      It’s easy to see the warning light, and even maybe check battery voltage with the engine running. If the battery voltage is at or below 12.6 volts, the alternator must be bad, right? After all, we would normally see 13.5 to 14.5 volts. This is what I like to call a reactive diagnosis. We react based on what we know is common and think that what we initially see tells the story. Sure, it’s possible that the alternator may be bad, but only possible. A fact of electrical diagnosis is that the majority of all electrical problems are caused by higher-than-normal resistance – in other words, a poor connection.
      Diagnostic Tips
      How, as technicians do we keep from making this mistake? We have to remember that electrical systems are far more complicated than they have been for years, and they require correct system voltage in order for all of the computers and electronics to work properly.
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      When diagnosing charging systems, an important detail not to overlook is performing a voltage-drop test on the battery and alternator cables. It’s safe to say that higher than normal resistance is responsible for the good majority of misdiagnosis and comebacks.
      The traditional tools we use for battery and charging-system diagnosis are a digital battery tester, a multimeter, a load tester and an amp clamp. However, for modern charging-system diagnosis, a scan tool has become a must-have. Modern charging systems are no longer stand-alone systems, with the vehicle ECM playing a large part in their control and operation.
      A power-management system is a more accurate name than charging system, and it includes the alternator, battery and ECM. These systems have been developed to improve fuel economy, battery life and alternator operation, and not only do they monitor battery condition, but some systems also can estimate battery condition as well. They control and adjust charging output and they also can perform diagnostics and set diagnostic trouble codes. Good alternators can go bad, but if you’re faced with answering questions and giving advice to your customers at the counter, make sure they’re covering all the bases of diagnosis, so a good alternator doesn’t turn ugly.
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    • By Counterman
      Nineteen sixty-five was a unique year for the Chevrolet Corvette. It was the first year for disc brakes, and they came on all four wheels. The odd part about it was you still could order four-wheel drum brakes as an option, and receive a substitution credit since they were less expensive than disc brakes. Most people were ecstatic about the change, but there were some who stuck with old faithful: the drum brake.
      Drum brakes work very well – for many reasons – but there’s one overriding factor that led to the popularity of disc brakes: heat dissipation. All brakes are nothing more than a way to convert mechanical energy into heat energy. When the brakes are applied, the friction of the pads or shoes slows the vehicle down and generates heat in the rotor or drum as that mechanical energy is transferred to heat energy through friction.
      The challenge with all braking is what to do with that heat. When too much heat builds up in either the fluid, the friction material (pads or shoes) or the rotors or drums, there’s a loss of braking force, which is known as brake fade. The goal with all braking systems is to remove the heat. The more heat that’s removed, the more you can put back in. Disc brakes do this very well – especially those with vented rotors. They have a constant airflow passing over them and through them, allowing them to dissipate heat rapidly.
      Heat retention is the only real drawback to drum brakes. Even though most of the larger drums have cooling fins cast into them, it’s still inherent to their design that the heat is trapped inside the drum and simply takes longer to dissipate. Early on, no one had problems with drum brakes. Over time, as cars got faster and auto racing became popular, the weak point of drum brakes became more evident.
      But I still like drum brakes, and one of my favorite historical points of interest is that prior to 1965, the top (drum) brake option for the Corvette included heavy-duty metallic linings, special drums and forced-draft ventilation. The design and ultimate use of the disc-brake equipment required considerable research and engineering because the performance drum brakes worked so well that it was questioned whether they could match that performance with a disc brake. It’s for this reason that the very first disc-brake design on the Corvette featured four-piston calipers at all four wheels – a design that would outperform the current drum brakes.
      Drum brakes still are commonly used as rear brakes, especially on trucks. It’s true that drum brakes are less expensive – and some will cite that as one of the main reasons – but that’s really only a small factor related to their use.
      Advantages of Drum Brakes
      Operationally, drum brakes have many advantages over their disc-brake counterparts. One is that they are self-energizing. What this means is that as the brakes are applied, rotation of the drum will draw the shoes into it, effectively applying additional pressure to the brakes without additional effort from the driver.
      If you’ve ever driven an old vehicle with four-wheel drum brakes – even one without power assist – they stop very well without a great amount of effort. The self-energizing feature of drum brakes contributes to this, but it’s important to note that the self-energizing feature of drum brakes makes brake modulation difficult, which is another reason that disc brakes are preferred for performance driving. Brake modulation is the ability to precisely control the desired amount of braking force.
      Have you ever wondered why drum brakes seem to last so long? Quite often when you perform an inspection of drum brakes, they’re still in good condition, even when you’ve already replaced the front brakes on the same vehicle two or even three times. This is because the surface area of the shoes is much greater than that of disc pads, so the brakes can perform the same amount of work with less effort. Even though front brakes are responsible for the majority of braking, if you have two comparable vehicles – one with four-wheel disc and one with front disc and rear drum – you still will replace rear disc brakes at least twice, if not more, compared to how often the drum brakes would need service.
      Another advantage of drum brakes on the rear is the parking brake. The levers and mechanisms that make the parking brake work are of basic mechanical design, and are easily and inexpensively incorporated into the drum brake. In addition, the self-energizing property of drum brakes not only works in either direction, but also adds to their gripping power, so the parking brake is very effective for heavier or loaded vehicles, as well as forward or backward (meaning parking on a hill is no problem).
      The effective nature of a drum brake as a parking brake is why most trucks that have four-wheel disc brakes have a small brake drum machined in the center of the rear rotors, and a complete set of drum brakes (cable-operated only) that are there for the sole purpose of a parking brake. Oh yeah, and the 1965 Corvette had the same setup for parking brakes.
      How They Work
      Now that we’ve gone over the basic theory and some of the pros and cons, let’s look at how a typical drum brake works. I use the term “typical” here, because there are many different functional drum-brake designs. But overall, the theory behind them is the same.
      The brake shoes are mounted onto a backing plate, held in place by springs that allow them to move and pivot as required during use. The shoes rest against the backing plate on multiple contact points. In between the shoes, usually located at the top, is the hydraulic actuator, referred to as a wheel cylinder. There also is a brake adjuster between the shoes, and a number of springs that aid the return of the shoes to their normal rest position after braking.
      Most drum brakes also contain a self-adjusting mechanism. As the shoes wear, it keeps them adjusted close to the drum, so they contact it right away under braking. Drum-brake shoes need spring assist to return during non-braking, so they don’t continue to self-energize. For these reasons (unlike disc brakes, which are self-adjusting by design), drum brakes must be adjusted on a regular basis. They’ve always had adjusters, but it was a manual process and a normal maintenance requirement. The self-adjusting mechanism eliminated regular maintenance.
      When the brake pedal is depressed, brake fluid is forced into the wheel cylinder, and the pistons in the wheel cylinder are then forced out, applying pressure to the brake shoes. The shoes are pushed into the drums and the self-energizing effect takes place, increasing the braking force. When the pedal is released, the springs between the shoes draw them back in and the fluid returns to the master cylinder.
      Service Life
      What makes drum brakes wear out? Naturally, the brake shoes can wear out, and the drums as well. All brake drums have a wear limit for the inner diameter. In many cases, the drums can be resurfaced on a brake lathe. However, if they’re outside of their wear limit, they must be replaced.
      Since the shoes typically last a long time due to their surface area, the lining itself is often OK. Some of the most common problems include leaking or seized wheel cylinders; rusted or broken springs and hardware; leaking axle seals, which allows differential oil to contaminate the brake linings; and seized parking-brake mechanisms and cables. Rust also can take its toll on the backing plates as well.
      Some brake shoes are made with the lining riveted to the shoe; on others, the lining is bonded to the shoe. In some cases – primarily related to age – the bonding will begin to fail, and the lining will separate from the shoe.
      link hidden, please login to view When it comes to service, it’s not uncommon to find drum brakes that are in good condition, but the wheel cylinders have begun to seep fluid. It’s acceptable in these cases to replace only the wheel cylinder (as long as fluid has not gotten on the linings), clean the hardware and lubricate the brake-shoe contact points.
      On the flip side, if the shoes are worn out or contaminated or if hardware is rusty and old, it only makes sense to replace shoes, hardware and wheel cylinders at the same time. Even if the wheel cylinder isn’t leaking, if you don’t know its age, you’re better off replacing it. It’s not worth risking a leak a short time down the road. 
      When replacing brake shoes, a common practice is to do one side at a time, so you always have one side assembled for comparison. This is always a good idea. Even if you think you’ll remember where everything goes, when you start to put drum brakes back together, the pile of springs and hardware can begin to look more like a Rubik’s cube than anything else.
      One of the most important details is the cleaning and preparation of the backing plates. Commonly overlooked are the contact points between the shoe and the backing plate. These often get grooved where the shoe rests, and/or rust builds up around the spot, creating the same affect. These contact points should be cleaned or sanded until they’re smooth, so the action of the brake shoe isn’t restricted. If the contact points cannot be smoothed out or if the backing plate is rusty and disintegrating, it should be replaced.
      A DIFM Shopping List
      While the standard brake-drum repair includes shoes, drums, wheel cylinders and hardware kits, there’s a lot more that you can recommend. Brake fluid, of course, is on the list, but here’s a complete list of items to turn it into a professional job:
      1. Standard hardware kits. Standard hardware kits include return springs; hold-down springs, pins and cups; and adjustment window plugs. There usually are a few extra parts since the kits are designed to fit multiple different applications. It’s important to note that the standard kits don’t include specific parking-brake adjusters or hardware.
      2. Parking-brake adjusters and hardware. Parking-brake adjusters and hardware are not part of most hardware kits, but they are an essential part of brake operation. Even if the original adjusters look OK, close examination usually will show that there’s enough wear on the self-adjusting mechanisms to prevent them from working properly.
      3. Brake lubricant. It can handle the heat of brakes, it’s designed to stay in place and not wash away and it’s designed not to damage any of the rubber seals and components it comes in contact with. Use it sparingly on the contact points of the shoe to backing plate and brake-shoe pivot points.
      4. Parking-brake cables. If there’s any question about cable condition, this is the time to replace them. They should operate smoothly and freely.
      5. Backing plates. Often ignored but readily available, if backing plates are severely rusted or grooved deeply where the shoes rest, they should be replaced. Once the brakes are disassembled, it’s usually not much extra work.
      6. Since the majority of drum brakes are on the back of trucks or vans, it’s not uncommon to have an axle-seal leak. If this gear oil contacts the brake linings, it will ruin them. At minimum, axle seals will need to be replaced, and sometimes there are worn bearings or axles that are the culprit as well. This opens a lot of doors for additional sales for rear-axle service.
      7. Special tools. You may be able to get by without, but there are several special tools for drum brakes that make the job go much easier. Hold-down and return-spring tools save a lot of time, and brake-adjusting tools also are very useful. Final brake adjustment always is performed with the drum on, and brake-adjusting “spoons” work a lot better than screwdrivers.
      8. Brake/parts cleaner. A must for drum-brake jobs.
      Tips for DIYers
      A do-it-yourselfer might have a lot of questions about drum brakes. Replacing drum brakes generally isn’t hard, but it’s important to take your time. Here are a few pointers that could help your DIY customers get the job done right:
      1. Primary vs secondary shoes. When you look at a set of brake shoes, you’ll see that the linings are different lengths. These are referred to as the primary and secondary shoes. During braking, the rotation of the drum moving in a forward direction will draw the front (primary) shoe into the drum. That motion then is transferred into the rear (secondary) shoe. This, again, is the self-energizing effect. Because it initiates with the front shoe, the front shoe provides a greater braking force. So, in order to balance the force of the two shoes, the rear shoe has a greater surface area of lining. I will cautiously say this is always true. But, this highlights the importance of doing one side at a time. As mentioned before, there are many different functional drum-brake designs, and it’s possible that there’s an application where this could differ. So, always advise on the side of what you know is true the majority of the time. But, if someone is working on an oddball application, make sure they research it.
      2. The balance of the brake drum is very important. Just like a wheel that’s out of balance, a brake drum can cause severe vibration for the same reason. Most of them have weights welded on the outside when they’re balanced during production. These weights can interfere with some aftermarket wheels. If that’s the case, the drums will have to be balanced in a different manner. Don’t just grind away or break off the weight.
      3. You’ll see a lot of vehicles with rear drum brakes, but very few with front. They’re out there, however, and they will appear from time to time. On vehicles with four-wheel drum brakes, the front brakes are larger in size from the drums to the shoes, so the parts will be different.
      4. If drums brakes aren’t properly adjusted, it will result in a low brake pedal and uneven wear, and the vehicle can pull to one side during braking. When it comes to adjusting them, the best procedure is to adjust them by hand until they’re close to the drum, but so you can still slide the drum on and off easily. Once you reach that point, with the drum installed, seat the brakes by depressing the brake pedal multiple times. If wheel cylinders have been replaced, they’ll need bled at this point. The brake pedal should feel good if the initial adjustment is close. Finish up the adjustment with the drum installed, using a brake-adjusting spoon through one of the access holes in the backing plate or on the drum itself. Adjust the shoes outward until the drum begins to drag moderately, then back off the adjuster until the wheel spins freely. This usually takes three to four clicks of the adjuster. Very slight drag on the drum is acceptable. Experience is the best teacher.
      5. Last but not least, clean, clean, clean, and prepare the backing plates so the shoe contact points are smooth. Replace the backing plates if necessary, and all hardware.
      Armed with these tips, you should be able to get your customers everything they need for successful drum-brake replacement and answer their questions. So, all that remains is what do you want on your classic Corvette?


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    • By Counterman
      I get “flop sweats” when I panic. One of my worst cases was when working the front counter at a tire dealer. We had just inspected a Ford Taurus with a broken passenger-side spring and about 75,000 miles on the clock. The customer dropped off the car in the morning complaining of a knocking noise and notchy steering.
      I was on the phone with the customer at 9:30, getting approval on the recommended work. The estimate I wrote was for four struts, two springs and front upper strut mounts. I spent extra time finding parts, looking up labor times and calculating the out-the-door price.
      Then the customer asked, “Is there a less expensive option?” That’s when the flop sweats started. It got worse after he asked, “Can I get away with just replacing the fronts?”
      I quickly pulled out my calculator and rewrote the estimate on the fly for just the front struts, springs and upper mounts. After giving him the price, he asked if it would be half that price if he did only one side. My manager could see the sweat on my face and tapped me on the shoulder. “Tell the customer you will call him back in 10 minutes with an accurate estimate because you need to talk to the technician.”
      He told me that the only way the shop would do the job was to do it the right way. He explained that if we did just the front struts, it would make the vehicle unstable. Replacing only one strut would make the car unsafe and impossible to align. He said the customer would be unsatisfied if we did not do both front and rear struts. He might complain about a steering pull tomorrow, uneven tire wear in a month or that he could not control the vehicle.
      “If the customer does not buy something from us today, we will not go out of business. But, if they buy something unsafe, it could put us out of business.”
      Looking back, I was more concerned about the customer walking out of the shop without buying anything than doing the job the right way to make the vehicle functional and safe. I was looking for approval for my ego and not approval for a sound repair.
      All or Nothing
      Shocks, struts and springs do not operate independently. The condition of one corner of the suspension affects all the corners of the vehicle when driving straight or cornering. At low speeds, it might not be as noticeable, but it still happens. At higher speeds and cornering forces, the inability to control the movement of the suspension and body in one corner can change the contact patch for all the corners. During a panic situation, an unbalanced suspension with worn ride control can alter the contact patch to the point where the vehicle oversteers, understeers or can’t stop.
      The stability-control system measures the effectiveness of its correction in real time. How effective the correction is depends on the condition of the contact patch of the tires. What influences the health of this contact patch is the tire’s condition (construction, traction and even inflation) and the condition of the chassis components like the struts.
      The computer does not assign a value to the condition of the contact patch and there are no parameters (PIDs) in the programming for most systems. The corrections and the effectiveness are measured by the sensors in a high-speed feedback loop.
      A stability-control system will never set a malfunction light if the condition of the contact patch crosses a set threshold. But, as the condition of the chassis and tires diminishes, the corrections become less effective and more actions will be needed to bring a vehicle under control.
      These stability-control sensors are essentially blind to the condition of the state of the ride control and suspension. The software and sensors can’t diagnose a strut that has lost its gas charge or if a spring is weak. It just sees the results as data coming from the sensors. To the algorithms in the software, it could be a patch of ice or an over-loaded car. But, the reality is that it could be a worn out strut and a spring with a missing coil.
      Basically, if the suspension is not up to snuff, the correction by the system will take longer. This results in longer stopping distances or, in some cases, the vehicle ending up on its roof.
      For example, the most basic stability and ABS correction is a panic stop in a straight line. When the driver mashes the brake pedal, weight transfers to the front tires, loads the front suspension and causes the springs to compress. How much the springs compress is influenced directly by the condition of the shocks or struts. When the springs compress, the contact patch of the tires changes due to the weight and geometry of the suspension.
      The rear suspension is even more interesting. When the weight loads the front tires, the rear spring expands, which makes the contact patch of the rear tire smaller. If the shock or strut is unable to control the rebound of the spring, additional weight is transferred to the front, which nosedives even more.
      Applied to the front counter at your shop, it means that you should never sell just one strut, shock or spring. Also, you should be very careful selling just front or rear ride-control units. This approach might get the customer back on the road, but not in a safe vehicle.
      So, what did the customer do with his Taurus? After calming down and wiping the sweat from my brow, I explained why we recommended replacing all four struts. He finally understood and decided to replace all four struts and both front springs.
      The moral of the story: Stand by your recommendations. You’re not doing your customers any favors by recommending a less expensive part or repair.
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    • By kajal
      link hidden, please login to view sit is helps to prevent high levels of pressure from moving underneath the body while in motion.
      It is made for the base model probes only. Gt models will need to extend side skirts to fit properly. 

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