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DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

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Mac Tools - BWP151 - BL-Spec 1/2” Drive Brushless Impact Wrench


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The BWP151 BL-Spec 1/2” Drive brushless impact wrench is a heavy-duty, high-torque tool, powered for productivity, and designed for the automotive professional. Manufactured with a glass-filled nylon housing, the BWP151 is built to withstand corrosive automotive solvents and fluids common to the automotive repair environment.  And best of all, the BWP151 is now proudly made in the USA at our Charlotte, North Carolina plant with global materials.

 

 

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    • By Counterman
      Representing “the next wave of DieHard brand innovation,” the hand tools are “made to deliver reliability and confidence that’s ideal for all DIYers, including the new, younger generation of auto enthusiasts,” Advance said in a news release.  
      “We saw an opportunity to speak to the evolving, modern DIYer who’s looking to not only explore and build their DIY skills, but also their DIY confidence,” said Jason McDonell, executive vice president of merchandising, marketing and eCommerce at Advance. “That’s why DieHard hand tools are built with innovation in mind, along with the reliability and durability DieHard is known for.”
      A new, younger generation of auto enthusiasts with different levels of DIY confidence, ambitions and passions has emerged alongside an increase in vehicle demand and retention. In fact, the auto care category is expected to grow by 4.7% between now and 2027. The DieHard hand tools were specifically made to deliver the reliability and confidence these new, modern DIYers need, Advance noted.
      “This generation builds their toolbox over time, on a project-by-project basis that creates memory after memory,” said McDonell. “We wanted to develop tools that power their full potential – from the screwdriver that helped replace a taillight to learning why a ratchet is every auto DIYers best friend.”
      Hitting shelves and online just in time for Father’s Day, new DieHard hand tools are lab-tested to exceed all industry testing standards for strength and durability, with all hand tools coming with a lifetime warranty. DieHard tools were designed with new features, including an anti-slip design on all combination wrenches; ergonomic handles on all drivers; and professional-quality, 90-tooth sealed head ratchets that will last a lifetime, according to the company.
      Since acquiring the DieHard brand in 2019, Advance Auto Parts has continued to position the brand as driving the next generation of car care. Advance has brought the 50-year legacy of DieHard batteries to a new category – tools – and recently entered the electric-vehicle conversation with the launch of the first-to-market 12-volt battery designed specifically for hybrid and electric vehicles, DieHard EV.
      Advance Auto Parts also began rolling out DieHard power tools, jacks and lifts online and in store late last year. In honor of Father’s Day, shoppers can take $20 off the
      link hidden, please login to view from May 26 to June 22. To further celebrate the confidence new DieHard hand tools empower, this Father’s Day, Advance identified and surprised two modern DIY dads during their first foray into DIY with their own personal hype man, Jake Fehling – the “DieHard Hype Man in a Van.” With the help of Advance, Fehling charged into each DIY moment in a DieHard-branded van to encourage those selected and power future projects with a lifetime supply of DieHard hand tools.
      The retailer’s “DieHard Hype Man in a Van” also visited a local Advance Auto Parts in Charlotte, North Carolina, to surprise and delight dads “in the wild” with their own new set of DieHard hand tools.
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    • By Counterman
      During AutoZone’s fiscal second-quarter 2022 conference call in March, company executives asserted that its pandemic-driven sales momentum could be sustained, even after consumers blow through their stimulus payments.
      AutoZone’s fiscal third-quarter results did nothing to convince them otherwise.
      “We believed our competitive positioning was materially improved, as indicated by our significant retail share gains and rapidly accelerated commercial sales growth,” AutoZone CEO Bill Rhodes reflected during the company’s third-quarter conference call on May 24. “We believed customer behavior may have permanently changed. We continue to believe all of this today.”
      AutoZone reported fiscal third-quarter net sales of $3.9 billion, a 5.9% year-over-year increase. The company’s fiscal third quarter ended on May 7.
      Domestic same-store sales, or sales for stores open at least one year, increased 2.6% for the quarter. AutoZone delivered the 2.6% increase against some extremely tough comparisons: In the fiscal third quarter of 2021, same-store sales jumped nearly 29%.
      If AutoZone indeed is able to sustain its momentum from 2020 and 2021, “it’ll be the fourth time in the last 30 years that the economy and society have been through significant shocks leading to material acceleration in our growth in sales and profits, without a corresponding decline back to pre-recessionary or pre-pandemic levels,” Rhodes said.
      DIFM sales, which suffered in the first few months of the pandemic in 2020, continued to rebound. AutoZone’s commercial sales rocketed 26% higher to $1.04 billion, a third-quarter record for the company.
      Weekly commercial sales per store also set a quarterly record, at $16,600, up from $13,500 in fiscal Q3 2021. The company averaged approximately $87 million in total weekly commercial sales.
      During the quarter, AutoZone launched 43 net new commercial programs, finishing with 5,275 total programs.
      “As I’ve said since the outset of the year, commercial growth will lead the way in FY 22, and our results in the third quarter and year to date reflect this dynamic,” CFO Jamere Jackson said during the conference call.
      Rhodes attributed the DIFM growth to a number of companywide initiatives, including expanded hub and megahub coverage, “the strength of the Duralast brand,” technology investments, a more effective salesforce and improved delivery times.
      Domestic DIY sales slipped 4.5% during the quarter – another case of tough comps. Rhodes noted that U.S. consumers received stimulus payments in the third quarter of 2021, which led to record DIY-sales growth.
      “We’re very proud of our DIY results,” Rhodes added. “Considering we had such a tough comparison to last year, from the data we have available to us, we continued not only retain the enormous share gains in dollars and units built during the initial stages of the pandemic, but [also] modestly build on those gains.
      “Our performance, considering the amount of time from the last stimulus and the ending of the enhanced unemployment benefits, has substantially exceeded our expectations and gives us continued conviction about the sustainability of the massive elevated sales levels we have experienced since the beginning of the pandemic.”
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    • By Counterman
      What was the decade of the four-wheel drive (4WD)? Was it the 1970s or the 1980s? Or was it both? The popularity of trucks was growing rapidly in the ‘70s, and if you had a 4WD, it was just downright cool. Custom trucks were becoming a common feature in TV shows and movies, culminating with one of the more well-known 4WD trucks of the ‘80s in the TV series “The Fall Guy.”
      4WD trucks transitioned from understated vehicles that were utilized strictly for their inherent capabilities to stand-out custom road machines with graphics and features that let the world know you had one. In big letters, “4×4” became one of the most recognizable markings on a truck. Consumers wanted 4WD, and it was only a matter of time before it showed up on a car, which it did on the AMC Eagle in 1980.
      The popularity of the 4WD never waned, and the 4×4 graphics still adorn the side of many a pickup truck, but it also has blended permanently into SUVs and cars and has another name now: all-wheel drive. But is it the same, or is it different? Does it really matter? In order to understand, the foundation of knowledge sits with the operation of “old-school” 4WD, so let’s dial in to what it was, how it has evolved and where it is now.
      Rear-Wheel Drive
      The standard automotive powertrain for the majority of the 20th century was the front-engine, rear-wheel-drive (RWD) design. The rear axle assembly housed the differential and individual axles, and it is through this assembly that power was transferred to the wheels. Since this was the prevailing design of most cars and trucks on the road, no particular attention was drawn to it. For example, there were never any big letters on the side of a car that said “RWD.”
      Even though front-wheel-drive (FWD) and 4WD cars were designed and manufactured during the early years of the automobile, they didn’t flourish, and the durability and simplicity of the typical RWD design made it the sole choice of automobile platforms for many manufacturers.
      Figure 1 pictures a typical RWD vehicle. The power generated by the engine is transferred through the transmission to the driveshaft, differential, axles and rear wheels. Figure 2 shows a typical “old-school” 4WD vehicle. A differential/axle assembly is now located at the front of the vehicle, and to transfer power to the front, a transfer case is installed after the transmission and a short driveshaft is installed between the transfer case and front axle.
      link hidden, please login to view You also will notice that the front differential/axle assembly is different in two ways. One, the differential location is offset for clearance since the engines were always mounted in the center; and two, since the front wheels must turn in order to steer the vehicle, the axles must have some type of articulating joint at the end – the most common of which is the traditional universal joint, or U-joint.
      The transfer case transfers the power that exits the transmission to either the rear wheels (RWD), or the front and rear wheels at the same time (4WD.) Another feature of a traditional old-school transfer case is that it offers both high and low ranges in either RWD or 4WD positions, as well as a neutral position. This is so if the vehicle must overcome particularly difficult terrain, it can be placed in the low range so the engine will operate at a higher RPM to provide additional torque to the wheels. The high range is 1:1, which means the output speed of the transfer case is the output speed of the transmission. The low-range ratio varies depending on manufacturer.
      Differentials
      An important aspect of all this is differential operation. The differential itself transfers the power from the driveshaft to the axles, and it is necessary because it allows power to be transferred to the wheels, but also allows them to travel at different speeds when turning a corner. A conventional differential is considered an “open” design. An operating characteristic of an open differential is that it transfers power to the wheel that spins the easiest.
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      A limited-slip differential contains clutch packs built in between the side gears and the differential case. When one wheel begins to spin from loss of traction, the clutches will grab and transfer power to the other wheel. The same clutches will slip just enough to allow the wheel speeds to differ when going around a corner, so the normal differential action is still available.
      Performance cars typically are equipped with a limited-slip differential so under acceleration they can achieve traction through both wheels. The next time you’re driving, and you see one black mark on the road from a burnout, that vehicle had an open differential. If you see two black marks, that car had limited-slip.
      It’s important to note that the majority of cars and trucks come standard with open differentials, due to the additional cost of limited-slip. Limited-slip differentials have always been an option, just not standard. So, on a four-wheel-drive vehicle equipped with open differentials, technically speaking, the maximum number of wheels that can put power to the ground at any given time is two. That seems kind of funny on something known as a 4×4, but it’s still twice as much traction as RWD only, and for the most part it got the job done. Most people who were really going to be in some serious off-road situations would be sure they were equipped with limited-slip differentials.
      We’re almost down to the final details of 4WD. For normal driving, the transfer-case gear selection would be “2WD High.” The internal construction of the transfer case is similar to a manual transmission, and there was a shifter lever protruding through the floor that was connected mechanically (via linkage or cable) to the transfer case. The vehicle operator would stop the vehicle, place the transmission in Neutral, then shift the transfer case into 4WD High, 4WD Low or 2WD Low, depending on their needs.
      The last factor of old-school 4WD was the front hubs. The front wheels were equipped with locking hubs. When unlocked, the wheels rotate freely, and the front axle/differential remains motionless in order to reduce drag and wear on the drivetrain. When you lock the front hubs, you are in effect locking the front wheels to the front axles and differential. When you do this, you notice an immediate effect in the steering effort and drag on the drivetrain.
      So, in order to engage 4WD, you had to do two things. One, shift the transfer case into 4WD so that it drives the front differential; and two, lock the front hubs so the wheels are engaged to the front differential. That’s the way it worked and that’s what you had to do. Old-school 4WD was purely mechanical, basic and crude for lack of a better description, but it worked.
      The drawback to having 4WD engaged was that it put additional strain on the drivetrain, caused additional wear to the tires and had a drastic effect on fuel mileage. This was because when engaged in a 4WD mode, the transfer case mechanically linked the front and rear differentials, so both of them were in effect fighting each other to turn at different speeds based on factors of traction, tire wear and vehicle direction (steering).
      If you’re thinking 4WD was a rather imperfect system, it was. And it wasn’t designed for full-time use on the road. But that was then – now, understanding AWD gets easy.
      To start with, the ability to transfer power to all four wheels has incomparable benefits for traction, vehicle stability and handling. Not only does this translate to the safety of daily driven vehicles, but it translates to the racetrack as well. The first vehicle to take advantage of an all-wheel-drive system in racing, the Audi Quattro, was such a dominating force in rally racing in the early ‘80s that it made the world take notice of AWD.
      All-Wheel Drive Emerges
      As the automotive industry was going through major changes in technology during the 1980s, 4WD was about to come along for the ride. Computers and electronics were opening a world of possibilities, and consumers were ready for a change too. All of a sudden, nobody wanted to get out and engage the front hubs on a 4WD. Pushing a button was better, so a number of different solutions were developed, including vacuum-operated hubs and vacuum and electronically actuated front axles.
      Constant-velocity (CV) joints began to replace U-joints and smooth out steering effort on the front of a 4WD, as well as allow for independent differentials and independent front suspension, and it didn’t take long before the mechanical engagement of the transfer case gave way to push-button 4WD. All control was now via button or knob to select 2WD High, 2WD Low, Neutral, 4WD High or 4WD Low.
      With electronic and vacuum control making 4WD engagement easier, it still had the problem of straining the drivetrain when engaged, and a way was needed to allow both the front and rear drivetrains to operate yet work independently of each other. The answer was a third differential mechanism in the transfer case (how the Audi Quattro system worked.) This allowed the front and rear differentials to turn at different speeds when needed, eliminating strain on the drivetrain. Some of these systems, when they first came out on trucks, were referred to as full-time 4WD.
      This is where the lines begin to blur on the difference between AWD and 4WD, but there are a few more advancements in technology that draw a clear line in the sand. With antilock braking systems (ABS) and traction-control systems (TCS), we all of a sudden knew exactly what was happening at each wheel at all times. Was it losing traction? Was it locking up under braking? All of this data was now available, and engineers knew that the key to vehicle performance, safety and handling all together was in the ability to precisely control what happened at each wheel at any given point in time.
      Here’s the icing on the cake: AWD differential technology. Traditional differentials, even limited-slip, were mechanical devices. There was no external control of how they operated. With electronics and computer control, the traditional differential became a technologically advanced unit containing not only gearsets, but also clutch packs like those in an automatic transmission, and their own pumps to pressurize the fluid.
      The same technology is present in both front and rear differentials, as well as center differentials/transfer cases. AWD systems have the ability to precisely control the amount of torque that is transferred to any given wheel at any point in time, providing absolute control of the vehicle.
      In conclusion, 4WD is functional, durable, rough and tough, but not user-friendly. AWD is the product of technology, computers and electronics. The precise control of exactly what happens at each wheel not only results in superior vehicle stability and control under any driving condition, but it also can truly transmit torque to any of the four wheels at any point in time.
      It’s easy to see how the lines blur between the two and opinions may vary, but the way I see it, the difference is clear. AWD is the technologically superior system. Do you want to dig deeper into any of this? Let us know!
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    • By Counterman
      3D Beta, a Beta Utensili Spa Group company, recently announced the immediate availability of the C50S three-drawer service tool cart manufactured in Italy.
      Developed from customer feedback, the cart reveals Beta Tools’ commitment to deliver the latest product, the company noted.
      “Our new C50S tool cart is adaptable for many industrial and automotive applications,” said Randy Booth, general manager at Beta Tools USA. “It is brilliantly designed with an assortment of optional features.”
      Unique features and benefits include:
      Thermoplastic worktop handles the demands around the shop. Three drawers (23¼” x 143/8” x 2¾”) on ball bearing slides for easy opening and closing. Drawer capacity of 33 pounds is evenly distributed. Unit is key-locking to secure tools. Side-mounted nine-piece screwdriver holder and two built-in bottle holders Large lower shelf protected by a PVC, oil-resistant rubber mat. Static load capacity of 880 pounds Optional items include a folding side shelf, 5000MS a paper roll holder, 2400S-R/PC and a rear-mounted pegboard tool panel. All three C50S colors – orange, grey and red – are in stock and ready to ship throughout the United States.
      For more information: call 717-449-5044 or visit the
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    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

    • By Counterman
      We deal with a LOT of electrical components on a daily basis, but equally important is the wiring that connects these components to the rest of their circuits. Sensors, switches, solenoids and actuators require electrical power to do their jobs. Quite often, though, our customers condemn the part we just sold them as “defective” when it doesn’t fix their issue.
      Considering the thousands of feet of wire in today’s automobiles, along with dozens of quick connectors and repair pigtails, sometimes it’s just a matter of bad wiring that causes our quality parts to look bad. Repairing these wires and connections requires only a handful of basic tools and some universal supplies, many of which we sell and stock every day.
      Electrical troubleshooting can be intimidating to the novice, and sometimes frustrating even for the professional. At its most basic level, all we really need is power at the correct voltage, and a ground to complete the circuit. Diagnostic tools of all kinds use basic electrical principles to help us find and isolate the problem. From the most advanced digital volt ohm meter (DVOM), right down to a homemade continuity tester made from wires and a light bulb, you’re looking for the potential to pass electricity through a circuit.
      The DVOM, also known as a “multimeter,” combines many of these tests into one handheld unit. It can test for continuity, resistance, voltage and amperage, giving the user the ability to diagnose issues in powered or ­­
      un-powered circuits. Specialized attachments can test spark plug wires, fuse blocks and even probe temperatures.
      The simple “ice-pick” continuity tester is sort of a “go/no-go” gauge to show if there is a break in a powered circuit. If a completed circuit is ON, it lights up. No lights? No power! The self-powered test light is similar to the continuity tester, but has its own power source, so it can be used on components that are disconnected from their circuit. These can be used to actuate solenoids and switches, and power other circuits for component testing.
      Once the problem in the circuit has been diagnosed, we must repair the fault in the circuit. If a standalone component is bad, we simply replace it with the appropriate cataloged part. If the fault is in the wiring or a connector, other tools and supplies will be required. For connector failures, technicians often simply connect a new pigtail to the existing wire ends, taking note of the position of each wire and its color coding. For wire failures, the technician would repair or replace the damaged section of wire.
      These wiring repairs can be done in many different ways, with varying results and quality.
      The most common type of wire repair is a “crimp” connection. A repair terminal or connector is attached to the wire end by stripping away approximately a half-inch of insulation, sliding the terminal over the bared wire and crimping it into place with a plier-type crimping tool. This is only a mechanical connection, and aside from twisting wires together by hand (NOT recommended, by the way!), this is the weakest and least effective type of wiring repair.
      The best method of inline wire repair is to twist the wires together and solder the joint, creating a conductive and solid connection that lasts much longer than crimp-type connections. This method requires additional tools and supplies: a soldering iron, rosin-core solder and heat-shrink tubing to insulate the soldered joint. An “in-between” alternative is the heat-shrink crimp connector, which is crimped in place, then heated to create a weather-resistant seal. A quality electrical tape can be used to protect crimped or soldered repairs, but heat-shrink provides better protection. Heat-shrinking can be achieved with a heat gun, or (carefully) with a disposable lighter or mini-torch.
      In addition to the most common diagnostic and hand tools, there are a wide array of specialty tools available for various wiring-repair tasks. Some of these are gimmicky, single-purpose tools, but others can be incredibly handy, like terminal-release tools. These special probes are used to release individual wire terminals from their connector housings, although small picks or screwdrivers can work in a pinch. These tools also are helpful for separating connectors from their mating components. Test leads, with pins or alligator clips, also are handy additions to the electrical toolkit, as well as a good variety of repair terminals, wire, tape and fuses.
      Most of these tools and supplies fall into the category of “non-catalog” ­parts, although pigtail connectors usually are found alongside the components to which they connect. Depending on the skill level of the individual
      customer, you may find yourself recommending one or more of these tools and repair supplies. Knowing these best practices, as well as what tools and supplies are necessary for a particular repair, allows us to recommend the most appropriate solutions, even if it isn’t the component your customer came in for originally!
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