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Mac Tools - BWP151 - BL-Spec 1/2” Drive Brushless Impact Wrench


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The BWP151 BL-Spec 1/2” Drive brushless impact wrench is a heavy-duty, high-torque tool, powered for productivity, and designed for the automotive professional. Manufactured with a glass-filled nylon housing, the BWP151 is built to withstand corrosive automotive solvents and fluids common to the automotive repair environment.  And best of all, the BWP151 is now proudly made in the USA at our Charlotte, North Carolina plant with global materials.

 

 

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