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5G will become the preferred technology of V2V for automobile manufacturers. America will become the main market for deploying V2V technology.


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Chongqing Feilong Jiangli latest information. Juniper Research, a market research firm, predicts that by 2030, more than 62 million vehicles will have V2V communication capabilities, more than 1.1 million more than in 2019. V2V solution can achieve low delay communication between vehicles, especially to improve driver safety.

The new study by Juniper Research, titled Consumer Networked Automobile: Remote Information Technology, Vehicle Application & Networked Automobile Business 2018-2023, shows that the 5G network launched in 2019 will be the key driving factor behind the expansion of V2V communication technology. The study predicts that OEM will prefer to use 5G technology for V2V communications rather than other technologies because 5G technology has lower latency and higher radio frequency range.

Juniper Research found that the development of 5G technology will promote the commercial deployment and interoperability of 5G technology, and predicted that by 2030, the United States will become the main market for deploying V2V technology, and 60% of new cars sold in the United States will have V2V function. The technology could reduce the annual death toll in the United States by more than 9,300 people, accounting for 25% of motor vehicle deaths.

In addition, the study also predicts that manufacturers of automotive original equipment will explore new strategies such as on-board content subscription to generate revenue in addition to automotive sales. The study predicts that applications directly integrated into vehicles will generate more than $2.2 billion in revenue by 2030.

Juniper Research suggests that in addition to using 5G networks, OEMs must also open up their on-board ecosystems to third parties to accelerate the development of emerging and future automotive content revenue streams.

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      The Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association’s (AASA) Technology Council (ATC) has extended the submission deadline for the 2022 Technology Innovation award to Aug. 8.
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      Finalists will pitch their new technologies during the virtual ATC Fall Meeting on Sept. 7, and the winner will be announced during the AASA Technology Conference to be held Sept. 25-28.   
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      Past winners of the ATC Technology Innovation Award  
      2021 –  link hidden, please login to view, visual search  2020 –  link hidden, please login to view, automated load sheet technology   Award entry information is available 
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    • By Counterman
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    • By Counterman
      Selling shocks and struts simply comes down to knowledge, and sometimes it’s a little tricky because many of our customers confuse the difference between shocks, springs and struts. So, let’s start by clarifying the difference with information you can pass on the next time you get into the conversation across the counter.
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      link hidden, please login to view The assembled coil-spring and shock-absorber unit is referred to as the strut, but from a functional standpoint, you can still think of them as a shock, spring and related mounting components – because that’s all they are.
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    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

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