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RockAuto Promo - KYB Shocks and Struts


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    • By Counterman
      In the summer of 1974,
      link hidden, please login to view introduced a limited line of MacPherson Strut replacement cartridges, Gas-a-Just and Premium Heavy Duty shock absorbers to North America.   Celebrating the Past, Looking to the Future
      Surviving the turbulent ‘70s, KYB took full advantage of the economically booming ‘80’s, building a new 500,000-square-foot North American manufacturing plant in Franklin, Indiana just outside Indianapolis. The Franklin plant has been building OE and aftermarket shocks and struts since 1986. It continues to grow with the addition of a research and development lab, “clean” room for assembling shock valving, and most recently, being honored as the 2019 Industrial Plant of the Year for Wastewater Quality for reducing wastewater discharge 40% to the City of Franklin, KYB said.
      The next few decades saw growth, with a new office being opened in Addison, Illinois, in 1999, and the launch of highly popular MonoMax truck shock just after the Millenium, according to KYB. In 2008, the company debuted the Strut-Plus complete assembly, which it said helped to set the standard in aftermarket ride control.
      2011 saw the opening of a 275,000-square-foot distribution center in Greenwood, Indiana, just up the road from the Franklin manufacturing plant. The close proximity of these two locations allowed for quicker development and manufacturing of new applications and product lines, as well as faster distribution to customers throughout North America. The Addison, Illinois, office was moved to the Greenwood facility in 2014, completing the consolidation of administration, distribution, and manufacturing.
      As it celebrates the past and looks to the future, KYB said it continues to grow, with monthly announcements of additional applications and fitments, new product releases, such as KYB JAOS lift kit applications, and a new product line scheduled for release in 2025.
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    • By Counterman
      f you read automotive articles on a regular basis, you’ve no doubt read about the scientific side of brakes many times. They convert kinetic energy, which is the energy of motion, into heat energy through friction between the brake linings and the drum or rotor. Because of this, brakes get hot…real hot…and dissipating the heat is one of the most critical factors affecting brake operation.
      So, would you believe that shock absorbers work off the same scientific basis of converting kinetic energy into heat energy? It’s true, and here’s how it works.
      Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. The springs on a vehicle support the weight of it and allow the suspension to move. But what would happen if there were no shock absorbers? Every time you hit a bump, the springs would compress then expand, and do this over and over again until they finally settled down.
      If you’ve never experienced the sensation, which is something like rocking on a boat, you’ve likely seen it on a car going down the road. The front or rear goes up and down, up and down, literally “bouncing” down the road. It happens, in this case, not due to the lack of shocks, but due to the fact that they are simply worn out, so for all practical purposes, they may as well not exist.
      link hidden, please login to view The springs absorb the kinetic energy from hitting a bump, but since springs are considered elastic objects, the energy is turned into potential energy. And, in the case of a spring, or any elastic object, the potential energy is then released, and the energy output equals the energy input. The spring will return to its original shape. At that point, the momentum of the car body creates kinetic energy, which in turn acts on the spring in the opposite direction. As you can see, this is a vicious circle, and we need shock absorbers to control it.
      The job of a shock absorber is therefore to control the kinetic and potential energy of a spring by dampening its movement. Shock absorbers are filled with hydraulic oil, separated between two different chambers. Between the two chambers is a piston and valve assembly. (See Figure 1). The piston is connected to a piston rod which moves in and out of the shock as the suspension moves.
      Compression is when the piston rod is forced into the shock; rebound is when the piston rod is pulled back out. The key lies in the valving, which restricts the flow of oil between the two chambers. Forcing the oil through these valves creates friction, which in turn creates heat. Yes, shocks do get hot, and now the shock has turned kinetic energy into heat energy.
      Changing the size of these valves changes the amount of force it takes for compression or rebound, which ultimately changes the ride characteristics of the vehicle. This is one of the main reasons there’s a difference in feel between a sports car and a luxury car. 
      The more restrictive the compression and rebound, the less the suspension spring will move, which provides improved handling and stability characteristics, such as those desired on a sports car, but this also results in a firmer ride. Less restrictive compression and rebound allows greater spring movement and a softer ride, but not as good handling characteristics. There’s always a tradeoff.
      The comparison between the compression and rebound forces in a shock absorber is the shock ratio. Many standard shocks have a 50/50 ratio, meaning the compression and rebound forces are equal. Unequal forces one way or the other can have a drastic effect on handling, and one of the best examples to demonstrate this is with some old school drag racing tech. In drag racing, it’s important to shift the weight to the rear of the vehicle to increase traction while launching. One of the ways to attain this is by using 90/10 shock absorbers on the front.
      What this means is that of the total compression and rebound forces, 90% of the force is required to compress the shock, but only 10% of the force is required to extend the shock. When launching, the front of the car wants to lift as weight shifts to the rear. With a 90/10 shock, the front will unload easily and allow the weight to shift to the rear. Then, since it takes a much greater force to compress the shock, instead of the car coming right back down and bouncing in the front after hitting the track, the shocks will remain extended with the weight shifted rearward, and slowly settle as the car goes down the track.
      It often takes a while and a few different adjustments with shock ratio, both front and rear, to get a drag car suspension properly “tuned” in. By the same token, stock vehicles, either performance or luxury, are engineered to find the best of both worlds in handling versus comfort. So, the next time you talk about shocks to your customer, make it fun and talk a little science. 
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    • By Counterman
      KYB recently unveiled the KYB Parts Catalog app.
      While most mobile catalog apps only ask for the year, make and model when searching for part numbers, KYB said its app dives much deeper, requesting information such as engine size, trim package and drivetrain type when applicable.
      The additional levels of detail provide “an accurate and much narrower list of recommended shock-and-strut applications and part numbers,” according to the company.
      With the app, service writers and technicians can quickly search for the part they need without accessing a computer. The app also provides recommended part numbers for performance-upgrade shocks and struts, strut mounts, boots and bumpers if available.
      The app can recommend the closest retailer or wholesaler from which to order the part, KYB noted.  
      “The new KYB Parts Catalog app quickly provides repair shops with the right part number, helping to reduce repair time and opening repair bays quicker,” the company said in a news release.
      Those who were using the KYB Shocks app will be automatically updated to this latest version, KYB said. New users can download the KYB Parts Catalog on The App Store and Google Play.
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    • By Counterman
      KYB said it has developed an environmentally friendly hydraulic fluid for shock absorbers.
      The newly developed SustainaLubeliminates the environmental risks associated with petroleum, according to KYB. The  
      Full release to the market is planned for 2026.
      The new fluid contributes to carbon neutrality by switching from petroleum-derived base oil to naturally derived base oil. It absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere during cultivation of the plants used for the base-oil raw materials, also reducing CO2 emissions during transportation, according to KYB.  
      SustainaLub is biodegradable up to 60% or more according to the Eco Mark certification standard (OECD301). The base-oil and additive formulation is recyclable, reducing environmental issues in the long term, KYB noted.
      “As a specialized global manufacturer of hydraulic equipment, KYB has long been involved in maintaining and improving the safety and comfort of automobiles,” the company said in a news release. “Using that experience, we are striving to achieve environmental balance without compromising performance or reliability. Not only does SustainaLub improve maneuverability and stability by applying it to the various damping force valves that we already offer, but it also improves the feel of the product by applying friction-control technology, for example KYB Prosmooth shock absorbers.”
      Replacing petroleum-based oil in KYB shock absorbers with this new hydraulic fluid will save up to 15.6 million liters of oil per year, according to KYB.
      Tested in Japan
      All new KYB products undergo reliability evaluation at the KYB Development Center in Japan.
      “Thorough performance and quality evaluation involves both bench tests and actual vehicle testing on our state-of-the-art test track,” KYB said. “This in-house design of a hydraulic oil recipe is unique to a manufacturer specializing in shock absorbers.”
      The KYB team participating in the All Japan Rally Championship JN-2 class introduced SustainaLub to their vehicles from Round 6 onwards They analyzed and verified the performance and durability in the harsh race environment, KYB noted.  
      In addition, SustainaLub was trialed in the vehicle used in the Lexus ROV (Recreational off-Highway Vehicle) Concept customer-experience program. It was used for Lexus’s first ROV equipped with a hydrogen engine. The data accumulated also contributes to technology development for future practical applications, and work toward the realization of a carbon-neutral society.
      “KYB plans to ultimately apply the technology to all hydraulic products involved in realizing a sustainable mobility society,” the company said. “As a specialized manufacturer of hydraulic equipment, KYB has long been working to improve the ride comfort and handling stability of automobiles. Based on this experience, KYB will continue to pursue advances in performance and reliability while keeping environmental impact at the forefront of development.”
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    • By Counterman
      ZF Aftermarket announced it is launching 16 new part numbers for continuous damping control (CDC) shock absorbers available for passenger vehicles in the U.S. and Canada, covering a variety of BMW 5, 6 and 7 models.
      In addition, the company said it is expanding the range of TRW brake boosters and master cylinders originally launched at AAPEX 2023.
      ZF Aftermarket also is planning to release additional CDC part numbers in the first quarter of 2024.
      The CDC electronic damper system has been in large-scale original equipment production since the mid-2000s and is offered for many vehicles, from luxury cars to SUVs to compact cars. “ZF has produced more than 34 million CDC dampers globally, setting the stage for growing demand in the aftermarket,” the company said.
      SACHS CDC shocks for passenger cars provide perfect damping in any situation, according to ZF Aftermarket. State- of-the-art technology continually records variables that affect ride control, anticipating and adjusting the damping force to the external conditions.
      “We are very pleased to offer SACHS continuous damping control shocks in the USC market and look forward to continuing to build out this product line, Likewise, we are expanding the availability of TRW braking products to provide our customers with even more ‘True Original’ parts,” said Mark Cali, head of independent aftermarket, USC for ZF Aftermarket.
      ZF said it is also adding 53 part numbers for TRW brake boosters, extending the range of ZF brake boosters to a wide range European make vehicles in the USC market.
      ZF Aftermarket is also expanding its line of TRW brake master cylinders manufactured in steel, aluminum or cast iron. The 69 new parts feature OE-specified rubber seals and dust caps to resist ageing and come with fitting accessories included. TRW brake master cylinders also include a chrome 6-free “silver” finish for steel and cast-iron models for a protective, durable and rust-resistant coating that is free of heavy metals, the company said.
      For more information, visit
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