Jump to content

  • Welcome to Auto Parts Forum

    Whether you are a veteran automotive parts guru or just someone looking for some quick auto parts advice, register today and start a new topic in our forum. Registration is free and you can even sign up with social network platforms such as Facebook, X, and LinkedIn. 

     

ZF Adding SACHS CDC Shocks, Expanding TRW Line


Recommended Posts

rssImage-6d6ab463234239b816527a7bdb9819e8.jpeg

ZF Aftermarket announced it is launching 16 new part numbers for continuous damping control (CDC) shock absorbers available for passenger vehicles in the U.S. and Canada, covering a variety of BMW 5, 6 and 7 models.

In addition, the company said it is expanding the range of TRW brake boosters and master cylinders originally launched at AAPEX 2023.

ZF Aftermarket also is planning to release additional CDC part numbers in the first quarter of 2024.

The CDC electronic damper system has been in large-scale original equipment production since the mid-2000s and is offered for many vehicles, from luxury cars to SUVs to compact cars. “ZF has produced more than 34 million CDC dampers globally, setting the stage for growing demand in the aftermarket,” the company said.

SACHS CDC shocks for passenger cars provide perfect damping in any situation, according to ZF Aftermarket. State- of-the-art technology continually records variables that affect ride control, anticipating and adjusting the damping force to the external conditions.

“We are very pleased to offer SACHS continuous damping control shocks in the USC market and look forward to continuing to build out this product line, Likewise, we are expanding the availability of TRW braking products to provide our customers with even more ‘True Original’ parts,” said Mark Cali, head of independent aftermarket, USC for ZF Aftermarket.

ZF said it is also adding 53 part numbers for TRW brake boosters, extending the range of ZF brake boosters to a wide range European make vehicles in the USC market.

ZF Aftermarket is also expanding its line of TRW brake master cylinders manufactured in steel, aluminum or cast iron. The 69 new parts feature OE-specified rubber seals and dust caps to resist ageing and come with fitting accessories included. TRW brake master cylinders also include a chrome 6-free “silver” finish for steel and cast-iron models for a protective, durable and rust-resistant coating that is free of heavy metals, the company said.

For more information, visit

link hidden, please login to view

The post

link hidden, please login to view
appeared first on
link hidden, please login to view
.

link hidden, please login to view

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10% Off All Brembo Pads, Rotors and Fluid

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Similar Topics

    • By Counterman
      f you read automotive articles on a regular basis, you’ve no doubt read about the scientific side of brakes many times. They convert kinetic energy, which is the energy of motion, into heat energy through friction between the brake linings and the drum or rotor. Because of this, brakes get hot…real hot…and dissipating the heat is one of the most critical factors affecting brake operation.
      So, would you believe that shock absorbers work off the same scientific basis of converting kinetic energy into heat energy? It’s true, and here’s how it works.
      Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. The springs on a vehicle support the weight of it and allow the suspension to move. But what would happen if there were no shock absorbers? Every time you hit a bump, the springs would compress then expand, and do this over and over again until they finally settled down.
      If you’ve never experienced the sensation, which is something like rocking on a boat, you’ve likely seen it on a car going down the road. The front or rear goes up and down, up and down, literally “bouncing” down the road. It happens, in this case, not due to the lack of shocks, but due to the fact that they are simply worn out, so for all practical purposes, they may as well not exist.
      link hidden, please login to view The springs absorb the kinetic energy from hitting a bump, but since springs are considered elastic objects, the energy is turned into potential energy. And, in the case of a spring, or any elastic object, the potential energy is then released, and the energy output equals the energy input. The spring will return to its original shape. At that point, the momentum of the car body creates kinetic energy, which in turn acts on the spring in the opposite direction. As you can see, this is a vicious circle, and we need shock absorbers to control it.
      The job of a shock absorber is therefore to control the kinetic and potential energy of a spring by dampening its movement. Shock absorbers are filled with hydraulic oil, separated between two different chambers. Between the two chambers is a piston and valve assembly. (See Figure 1). The piston is connected to a piston rod which moves in and out of the shock as the suspension moves.
      Compression is when the piston rod is forced into the shock; rebound is when the piston rod is pulled back out. The key lies in the valving, which restricts the flow of oil between the two chambers. Forcing the oil through these valves creates friction, which in turn creates heat. Yes, shocks do get hot, and now the shock has turned kinetic energy into heat energy.
      Changing the size of these valves changes the amount of force it takes for compression or rebound, which ultimately changes the ride characteristics of the vehicle. This is one of the main reasons there’s a difference in feel between a sports car and a luxury car. 
      The more restrictive the compression and rebound, the less the suspension spring will move, which provides improved handling and stability characteristics, such as those desired on a sports car, but this also results in a firmer ride. Less restrictive compression and rebound allows greater spring movement and a softer ride, but not as good handling characteristics. There’s always a tradeoff.
      The comparison between the compression and rebound forces in a shock absorber is the shock ratio. Many standard shocks have a 50/50 ratio, meaning the compression and rebound forces are equal. Unequal forces one way or the other can have a drastic effect on handling, and one of the best examples to demonstrate this is with some old school drag racing tech. In drag racing, it’s important to shift the weight to the rear of the vehicle to increase traction while launching. One of the ways to attain this is by using 90/10 shock absorbers on the front.
      What this means is that of the total compression and rebound forces, 90% of the force is required to compress the shock, but only 10% of the force is required to extend the shock. When launching, the front of the car wants to lift as weight shifts to the rear. With a 90/10 shock, the front will unload easily and allow the weight to shift to the rear. Then, since it takes a much greater force to compress the shock, instead of the car coming right back down and bouncing in the front after hitting the track, the shocks will remain extended with the weight shifted rearward, and slowly settle as the car goes down the track.
      It often takes a while and a few different adjustments with shock ratio, both front and rear, to get a drag car suspension properly “tuned” in. By the same token, stock vehicles, either performance or luxury, are engineered to find the best of both worlds in handling versus comfort. So, the next time you talk about shocks to your customer, make it fun and talk a little science. 
      The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By NAPA
      Chase Elliott and the No. 9 link hidden, please login to view team qualified ninth for Sunday’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Kansas Speedway. Elliott finished stage one in 10th and followed that up with an 11th-place result in stage two. The 28-year-old driver lined up fourth for an overtime restart in the final stage, driving to a third-place finish. It was Elliott’s second consecutive top-five result and his fifth top-five in the last six Cup Series races. The 2020 NASCAR Cup Series champion ranks third in the points standings, just 55 markers behind the leader. Chase Elliott started ninth in Sunday’s rain-delayed NASCAR Cup Series race at Kansas Speedway and was scored in the 14th position on lap 10 when he reported that his No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 was tight. As the run went on, he radioed that his Chevy’s handling was coming to him. Elliott was in 15th when green-flag pit stops started near lap 30. Crew chief Alan Gustafson called the driver of the No. 9 to pit road on lap 33 for four tires, fuel and an air-pressure adjustment. He was back inside the top 15 once the field cycled through pit stops. By lap 62, he found his way to 10th where he remained to end stage one on lap 80.
      After pitting for four tires and fuel during the stage break, Elliott took the green flag for stage two from the ninth position on lap 89. A chaotic restart shuffled the 28-year-old driver back to 15th, but as the run went on, he made up ground and climbed to 12th by lap 113. As green-flag pit stops were drawing near, Gustafson asked Elliott for feedback on the NAPA Chevrolet. After receiving positive comments from his driver, Gustafson radioed for Elliott to visit pit road on lap 119 for four tires, fuel and an air-pressure adjustment. Once the pit cycle was complete, Elliott was back up to 12th and continued to close in on the cars ahead of him. By lap 143, he re-entered the top 10. He battled hard to remain in the 10th position, but another car just barely beat him to the line to finish stage two, relegating Elliott to 11th.
      Under the stage-ending caution, Elliott reported that he really liked his NAPA Chevy’s balance. He brought the No. 9 Chevrolet to the attention of his pit crew for fuel and four fresh tires. A fast stop gained Elliott three spots on pit road. He started the final stage from the eighth position on lap 173. The early portion of the stage was plagued with cautions, with Elliott and the No. 9 team opting not to pit during the first few yellow flags. When the caution came out again on lap 198, Elliott pitted from the ninth position for four tires and fuel. Varying pit strategies put Elliott in the 20th position as the field lined up for the choose cone. He took the outside lane for the restart on lap 205 and powered his way back inside the top 15 on lap 208. Elliott continued his climb forward, reaching 10th less than 10 laps later. As the long green-flag run went on, he gained two more positions. Elliott was in eighth after a caution came out on lap 261, which sent the race into overtime. When pit road opened, Gustafson called Elliott in for right-side tires and fuel. Elliott was the fourth car off pit road, with the top nine cars all taking two tires. The 2020 Cup Series champion lined up on the outside of the second row for the overtime restart. He battled intensely in the final two laps to take the checkered flag in the third position.
      The finish was Elliott’s second consecutive top-five finish and his fifth top-five in the last six Cup Series races. The Hendrick Motorsports driver leaves Kansas Speedway third in the Cup Series points standings, just 55 markers behind the leader.
      Start / Finish: 9 / 3
      Points Standing / Total: 3rd / 412 pts. (-55)
      Next Race: Sunday, May 12, Darlington Raceway
      How to Watch or Listen: 3:00 p.m. ET on FS1, MRN or SiriusXM
      NAPA: 
      link hidden, please login to view
      Chase Elliott:  link hidden, please login to view
      Hendrick Motorsports:  link hidden, please login to view
      No. 9 Team:  link hidden, please login to view The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By Counterman
      B’laster Holdings announced the 
      link hidden, please login to view will be expanding into the refrigerants category with a lineup of products created to service and maintain both R-134a and R-1234yf automotive A/C systems. The B’laster A/C line is now available in retailers across the U.S., the company said.
      Features and benefits of the B’laster Refrigerants, according to B’laster Holdings, include:
      Smart Clips allow users to charge by temperature and provide an easier, more accurate way to determine when an AC recharge is complete. Charging an automotive AC system using temperature helps the user avoid overcharging the system. The Safe-Seal formulation permanently repairs micro leaks in both metal and rubber components found in an AC system. The stop leak technology is not reactive with oxygen or humidity because it is not a polymer-based stop leak so it won’t clog your AC system and is safe for use with RRR service machines. Safe-Seal circulates along with the refrigerant in the vehicle’s AC system, sealing micro leaks proactively before they become larger leaks over time. B’laster works with real mechanics to design its product offerings, so users get the perfect pairing of a professional-grade product with DIY package technology. “B’laster has created some of the best automotive care products in the market since 1957,” said Marketing & Product Manager, Morgan Pollen. “With decades of experience to build on, we’re excited about the new technology we’ve developed and incorporated into the B’laster A/C product line. We pride ourselves on being innovative and offering products that both professionals and DIYers can use.”
      The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By Counterman
      ZF Aftermarket announced the launch of 33 new part numbers in March for SACHS Continuous Damping Control (CDC) shock absorbers for approximately 1.6 million passenger vehicles in operation in the U.S. and Canada (USC). The new products expand ZF’s line of SACHS CDC shock absorbers by more than 70 percent, reflecting growing demand for advanced damping technology in the aftermarket, according to ZF.
      The CDC part numbers cover a variety of BMW and Audi models, among others. The CDC electronic damper system has been in large-scale original equipment production since the mid-2000s and is offered for many vehicles, from luxury cars to SUVs to compact cars. ZF said it has produced more than 35 million CDC dampers globally and plans to release additional CDC part numbers in the USC region throughout 2024.
      “Demand for continuous damping control shocks is skyrocketing in the USC aftermarket, so we’re very excited to deliver more of this advanced damping technology to our customers, and to continue building the SACHS CDC product line,” said Mark Cali, head of independent aftermarket, USC for ZF Aftermarket.
      The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • A-premium Auto Parts:5% OFF with Code GM5.
    • By Counterman
      Carter has expanded its line of electrical auxiliary water pumps to include three new part numbers tailored specifically for Tesla vehicles.
      “With a focus on meeting the unique demands of Tesla vehicles, these auxiliary water-pump SKUs are engineered to efficiently move fluid in high-temperature environments, keeping pace with the rapidly evolving technologies found in modern engines,” the company said in a news release.
      The new part numbers cater specifically to Tesla models, complementing Carter’s comprehensive range of water pumps that already cover 95% of domestic and import VIO,
      link hidden, please login to view noted. The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view

×
  • Create New...