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Adventry Presents Goodyear Belts At HDAW


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For the first time, Adventry Corp. planned to display its Goodyear Belt heavy-duty line of products at Heavy Duty Aftermarket Week (HDAW) in Grapevine, Texas, this week.

Goodyear Belts is a licensee collaboration between Adventry and The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company.

“Our team has worked hard to develop a full range of V-belts, serpentine belts, tensioners and pulleys for heavy-duty applications,” said Tara Cevallos, CEO of Adventry. “Heavy-duty aftermarket professionals expect great products and that’s what we deliver, along with our outstanding service.”

“We currently have more than 1,800 SKU’s, covering more than 98% of the market,“ said Chad Davis, senior product manager at Adventry. “In addition to our complete line of the highest-quality belts, the new Goodyear tensioner, pulley and FEAD Kit program is ideally suited for the needs of distributors, fleet managers and professional installers. Our customers have found our online catalog is second to none.”

Goodyear Belts’ new line of heavy-duty power-transmission products meets or exceeds OEM specifications. Belt materials have been developed and tested to provide dependable and durable service. Goodyear tensioners, pulleys and FEAD kits are designed to restore an engine’s serpentine belt drive to original specifications. For more information, visit booth 1834 at HDAW, 

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