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Maintenance tips of small refrigerated van


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Small refrigerated vans are mainly used for temperature-sensitive items such as food or medicine, so temperature is the key to small refrigerated vans. If the temperature is not adjusted properly, the goods will not be stored or transported in a perfect state. The following are 8 maintenance tips for refrigerated delivery van.

1. Before driving, check whether the oil used in the refrigerated van is sufficient, and the oil can reach the destination smoothly.

2.Check that the battery is connected well, make sure that the wire connecting the battery is not damaged, and remember to check whether the electrolyte is sufficient.

3. Before driving a s refrigerated van, check whether there are any parts that are not tightened or other problems. If there are any problems, you must first eliminate the fault before driving on the road.

4. make sure that the drainage device is unobstructed.

5. When loading goods, remember to keep the goods away from the air outlet of the evaporator, so that the cold air in the cargo box keeps circulating, and there is no place where air-conditioning cannot be obtained.

6. Check whether the coolant is correct. The pointer of the liquid level meter should be within the normal range. If the refrigerating liquid is insufficient, the refrigerating liquid should be refilled in time.

7. Adjust the seat belt to the extent that it is not loose or tight.

8. Check whether the electrical and wire connections are stable. Whether the wires are cracked or damaged.

During our normal use, the maintenance are also inseparable. The refrigeration unit is maintained according to the working hours of the engine. The maintenance time of small refrigerated van units is 500-700 hours. It needs to be replaced, air filter element, oil filter element, fuel filter element, and check the tightness of the belt, whether there is leakage in the refrigeration system, etc. However, in order to meet the needs of environmental protection, some brands of refrigeration units try to reduce the damage to the environment and reduce the emission of harmful substances. Therefore, synthetic engine oil or semi-synthetic engine oil is used to replace ordinary engine oil, thereby extending the maintenance time of the engine. Do maintenance once every 2000 hours.

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