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Sending tires abroad?


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Hi, I've been looking around and this distribution subforum seemed like a good place to ask:

I'm trying to handle an issue, where a co-worker wants to send 4 sets of tires to an Indian location. We are expats from Europe (Germany) and the tires are his personal posession.
Generally, do non-electronic parts like tires have to go through a lot of customs-shenanigans? I'm on the fence of taking care of it if it's not too much hassle or drop the issue entirely if it will cost too much research/ bureaucracy time.

Cheers,

P.

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