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Selling Jeep KL Cherokee 2 litre Turbo Diesel Engine With Warranty EBT 6/2014 - 2018


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Selling Jeep KL Cherokee 2 litre Turbo Diesel Engine With Warranty EBT 6/2014 - 2018

Specifications-

Jeep KL Cherokee 2 litre Turbo Diesel Engine Complete with Turbo and Manifolds

Item comes with three months warranty on parts and freight

EBT Prefix - 2.0 liter I4 Turbo Diesel Motors

Accessories are left on for your convenience 

3 - 5 day delivery time in Australia.

Australian Delivered Vehicle

To Suit normal Cherokee not Grand Cherokee

 

 

 

 

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Edited by JDC Parts
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      The cooling system no longer is focused on cooling as much as it is on managing and maintaining a consistent engine and transmission temperature. Since our industry always seems to find a way to inundate us with new acronyms and terminology with every model year, it could be only a matter of time before they start to call it a Powertrain Heat-Management System (PHMS).
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