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DIAGNOSING PERFORMANCE COMPLAINTS: The Process Can Be a Challenging Event


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Troubleshooting today’s technology can be challenging for even the most experienced technician. Making an accurate diagnosis, rather than throwing a lot of expensive parts and labor at the symptom can be a challenge. How would your shop handle the following customer complaints? a) Crank but no-start b) Hard starts c) Long crank time d) Misfire […]

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      One of the more difficult things about any technology is all the new terms you seem to get hit with, and in the automotive world, CAN bus was one of those terms. The second half, “bus,” was a term we had already used for many years, primarily as “bus bar.” A bus bar was a metal strip or bar that distributed power among multiple components.
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