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Samsung Electronics Leads European Autopilot Technology Patent Application


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According to a report issued by the European Patent Office (EPO), Samsung Electronics applied for 624 patents on automatic driving technology between 2011 and 2017, followed by Intel (590), Qualcomm (361), Bosch (343) and Toyota (338). Samsung Electronics of Korea has filed the largest number of patent applications related to auto-driving technology in Europe. Following Samsung Electronics are two other semiconductor companies, suggesting that autopilot technology is becoming a new battlefield for semiconductor companies.

It is noteworthy that information and communication technology (ICT) companies such as semiconductor manufacturers and electronics manufacturers are more active in patent applications for automatic driving than traditional automobile manufacturers. There are only three traditional auto manufacturers and component manufacturers in the top 10, including Bosch (No. 5), Toyota (No. 6) and Continental Group (No. 10). In addition, there are only seven automakers in the top 25, including Audi (17th), Honda (20th) and Nissan (25th).

From the national point of view, Europe (37.2%) and the United States (33.7%) are in the leading position in the research and development of automatic driving technology, while Korea (7%) is ahead of China (3%) but behind Japan (13%).

The number of patent applications related to automatic driving vehicles also surged from 922 in 2011 to 3,998 in 2017, an increase of 4.3 times in six years. Considering that the number of patent applications related to other technologies has only increased by 16% in the same period, the growth rate of patent applications for automatic driving technology is very noticeable. In 2012, for the first time, the number of patent applications for automatic driving technology exceeded 1,000 (1,121), reached 2,603 in 2015, reached 3,173 in 2016 and reached 3,998 in 2017.

Chongqing Feilong Jiangli has applied for 64 patents covering automobile water pumps, oil level meters and other products.

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