Quantcast
Jump to content

general heavy-duty 728x90


general heavy-duty 468x60


general heavy-duty 250x250

  • Welcome to Auto Parts Forum

    Whether you are a veteran automotive parts guru or just someone looking for some quick auto parts advice, register today and start a new topic in our forum. Registration is free and you can even sign up with social network platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Google, and LinkedIn. 

     

Samsung Electronics Leads European Autopilot Technology Patent Application


Recommended Posts

According to a report issued by the European Patent Office (EPO), Samsung Electronics applied for 624 patents on automatic driving technology between 2011 and 2017, followed by Intel (590), Qualcomm (361), Bosch (343) and Toyota (338). Samsung Electronics of Korea has filed the largest number of patent applications related to auto-driving technology in Europe. Following Samsung Electronics are two other semiconductor companies, suggesting that autopilot technology is becoming a new battlefield for semiconductor companies.

It is noteworthy that information and communication technology (ICT) companies such as semiconductor manufacturers and electronics manufacturers are more active in patent applications for automatic driving than traditional automobile manufacturers. There are only three traditional auto manufacturers and component manufacturers in the top 10, including Bosch (No. 5), Toyota (No. 6) and Continental Group (No. 10). In addition, there are only seven automakers in the top 25, including Audi (17th), Honda (20th) and Nissan (25th).

From the national point of view, Europe (37.2%) and the United States (33.7%) are in the leading position in the research and development of automatic driving technology, while Korea (7%) is ahead of China (3%) but behind Japan (13%).

The number of patent applications related to automatic driving vehicles also surged from 922 in 2011 to 3,998 in 2017, an increase of 4.3 times in six years. Considering that the number of patent applications related to other technologies has only increased by 16% in the same period, the growth rate of patent applications for automatic driving technology is very noticeable. In 2012, for the first time, the number of patent applications for automatic driving technology exceeded 1,000 (1,121), reached 2,603 in 2015, reached 3,173 in 2016 and reached 3,998 in 2017.

Chongqing Feilong Jiangli has applied for 64 patents covering automobile water pumps, oil level meters and other products.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


general heavy-duty 728x90


general heavy-duty 468x60


general heavy-duty 250x250

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Similar Topics

    • By Counterman
      The Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association’s (AASA) Technology Council (ATC) has extended the submission deadline for the 2022 Technology Innovation award to Aug. 8.
      This annual award celebrates a company that has shown extraordinary commitment to creating new and innovative products in business process technologies in the aftermarket including sales and marketing, IT and data management.  
      Finalists will pitch their new technologies during the virtual ATC Fall Meeting on Sept. 7, and the winner will be announced during the AASA Technology Conference to be held Sept. 25-28.   
      “This award is exciting because it showcases businesses that are putting in the work to make the aftermarket more efficient and more effective,” commented Chris Gardner, senior vice president, operations, AASA, and ATC executive council lead. “We are looking forward to seeing the newest best-in-class technologies and awarding the 2022 Technology Innovation Award during the AASA Technology Conference this Fall.” 
      Past winners of the ATC Technology Innovation Award  
      2021 –  link hidden, please login to view, visual search  2020 –  link hidden, please login to view, automated load sheet technology   Award entry information is available 
      link hidden, please login to view link hidden, please login to view link hidden, please login to view. Submissions are due by Aug. 8. The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By Counterman
      BMW, Porsche, Mini, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, Audi. You’re probably familiar with these brands, but how familiar are you with their parts?
      European vehicles need repairs just as often as American or Asian vehicles, if not more often. They also boast an extremely strong following among tuning enthusiasts. You’re almost guaranteed to find modified VWs, Audis and BMWs at just about any car show or meet you pull up to.
      So, what is it that sets these vehicles apart from the rest? Let’s take a look at what makes these vehicles so desirable to owners, and what we as parts pros need to know in order to help them buy the right parts for their needs.
      German Engineering
      Yes, that’s a reference to Volkswagen’s advertising campaign from the mid-2000s. These commercials capitalized on the popularity of automotive TV shows like “Pimp My Ride” and “Overhaulin.” They were cheesy, over the top and downright funny.
      All jokes aside, there’s something special about the phrase “German engineering.” German automakers have long led the industry with pioneering and innovative technology. The Benz Patent-Motorwagen (“patent motorcar”) was built in 1885 by the German Carl Benz, so you could say that cars were invented by the Germans – but it didn’t end there. Nearly every modern automotive system has been influenced or refined by German engineering and innovation: everything from seat belts to air bags, adaptive cruise control to antilock brakes and traction/stability control. The list goes on and on.
      There’s another trait that I associate with German engineering (and all European vehicles), but it comes in the form of an expression: “10 pounds of stuff in a 5-pound bag.” While it seems that cars aren’t getting any bigger, automakers are finding ways to fit more and more systems, parts and control modules into them than ever before.
      If you’ve ever looked under the hood of an Audi S6 or S7 with the 4-liter turbocharged V-8 engine (pictured above), you’ll know what I’m talking about. These engines don’t look like any other V-8 engine in the world, and they’re a good example of how creative automakers have to be in order to fit their powerplants into modern vehicles.
      Complexity
      There are, of course, a few drawbacks to this sort of innovation and creativity: namely, complexity. Complex systems tend to utilize more individual parts, and this means that they may be more vulnerable to part failures. What we mean by this is the more hoses, pipes or connectors automakers add to vehicles, the more likely it is that any of these parts could leak or fail and need to be replaced.
      Let’s look at an example of this complexity: the cooling circuit from an S55-powered BMW M3 or M4 (Fig. 1). This diagram shows the number of hoses, pipes and heat exchangers that are needed to cool the engine, the incoming charge air and the engine oil. While this system is designed to hold up to a lot of abuse, a single faulty connection or leaking hose could cause a breakdown.
      Lightweight Materials
      Plastics and composite parts are replacing steel and aluminum parts in the interest of weight savings and fuel economy. Unfortunately, this sometimes comes at the cost of durability. The turbocharged 1.8-liter and 2-liter engines found in modern VWs and Audis feature radiator hoses with plastic connectors on either end. These connectors are known to become brittle and crack after years of heat-cycling under the hood. You might find that the lower radiator hose on these same engines has a coolant-temperature sensor built into the connector in the interest of saving space.
      Plastic isn’t the only lightweight material being used by modern automakers. The bolts that secure the thermostat to the water pump on the N54-powered BMW 335i are aluminum and cannot be reused once they’re removed. Aluminum bolts also are used to secure the transmission pan on the Mercedes-Benz 722.9 seven-speed automatic transmission.
      As parts professionals, it’s our responsibility to always “sell the whole job” to our customers. If a customer comes in for a radiator because the original one cracked, you should suggest that they replace other parts such as the hoses, since they may be just as brittle as that radiator was when it failed. If your customer is replacing a component that’s secured with aluminum bolts or hardware, be sure to sell it to them so they have everything they need before they start the repair.
      Remove and Discard
      Let’s dive deeper into hardware, because it’s especially important on European vehicles. Torque-to-yield (TTY) fasteners are far more common on these applications, used everywhere from suspension points to drivetrain mounts, and everything in between. TTY fasteners are torqued to extremely high values. This literally causes the bolts to stretch nearly to the breaking point, but in exchange it’s able to apply the maximum clamping force possible. Since these bolts are stretched out when torqued, they should not be reinstalled, as they could snap when tightened.
      Fasteners with locking splines or nylon locking rings, or pre-applied threadlocking compounds, help to prevent them from loosening. These types of fasteners are rather common in European applications, and most cannot be reused once installed.
      It’s always a good idea to check your parts catalog for suggested hardware, and then pass that information to your customer. If you come across a repair in which you needed to replace the hardware, share that experience with your co-workers. Sharing your combined experiences will only benefit you, your team and your customers.
      Double Vision
      I’d like to conclude with a unique example I found while working on a 2017 BMW M4 with the S55 inline-6 engine. The vehicle was in for a boost-tap install so the customer could monitor boost pressure from a gauge mounted in the A/C vent. The boost tap was a billet aluminum spacer that mounted between the MAP sensor and the intake manifold. A hose connected the boost tap to a gauge inside the vehicle. The customer had installed the boost tap, but it was only reading boost pressure, not engine vacuum.
      During a visual inspection I quickly spotted the problem: The boost tap had been installed into the wrong location. There are actually two MAP sensors on this engine: One is located on the charge-air cooler on top of the engine, and the other is mounted on top of the intake manifold.
      The MAP sensor on top of the intake manifold is almost impossible to see because the charge-air cooler is in the way, but it’s the only one capable of reading engine vacuum since it’s located after the throttle body. This was a quick and easy fix, but it’s a good example of how easy it can be to miss something obvious in such a busy engine compartment.
      Redundant sensors can be common in European vehicles like the M4 from this example. So, be sure to ask your customer the right questions and really get to the bottom of what it is that they’re working on, and what they need to fix it right the first time.
      The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By Counterman
      Litens Aftermarket has just launched its new 
      link hidden, please login to view, and the company says it is prepared to “continue as the largest supplier delivering the highest quality of power transmission products.” “With this updated website, our current and future marketplace partners will have a better experience and are going to find it easier to locate valuable information such as our parts catalog, new-number announcements, what’s new at Litens and much more,” said John Lussier, president of Tendeco.
      Litens’ technology is applied globally to more than half of the vehicles on the road today, working to reduce emissions, while improving fuel economy, performance and passenger experience, according to the company. “So, it is only right for our website to reflect our capabilities in full capacity, while acting as a hub of resources and benefits to our customers,” the company added.
      “This new website emphasizes how important the use of OE quality in the aftermarket is,” said Damien Gabel, managing director, ATech. “Low-tensioning devices, overrunning alternator decouplers (OADs), BASFiltr and TorqFiltr and mid-hybrid tensioners are largely participating in the global CO2 reduction. We hope that this new website will provide clarity to the replacement market, in regard to the latest technology used in current cars.”
      What’s New?
      Not only is the new website easy to navigate, but it also was primarily built by keeping the company’s consumer needs in mind. The site has a direct link that can guide users to Litens’ online store, where customers can find products through associated VIN, make, model, year or engine, for a quick and direct purchasing process.
      “As our new website features are premised on convenience, we hope to configure a user-friendly experience for our clients and partners through,” said Lussier.
      Features include:
      Showcasing frequently updated new-product releases Sharing a platform filled with engaging news stories Providing contact information so anyone can reach Litens Aftermarket without difficulty Exhibiting an all-encompassing high-performance line “To help save time, effort and energy, we have crafted our new website’s ‘Download’ section, which is a source of trustworthy information on our products and their respective descriptions,” said Lussier. “Here, our channel audience can also access installation sheets that will simplify and support the installation process.”
      For more information, visit 
      link hidden, please login to view The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By Auto News
      Naveen Krishna Joins GPC as Executive Vice President and Chief Information & Digital Officer

      link hidden, please login to view

    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

×
  • Create New...