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Martin Senour Introduces PRO Filler Body Filler


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Martin Senour has introduced PRO Filler body filler, a premium line of lightweight filler, fiberglass-reinforced filler and putty.

The professional-grade product offering provides reliable, high-caliber performance in any repair, according to the company.

“Body shops seeking a straightforward, cost-effective solution to auto body repair look to the PRO Filler line for a quality product that will promote shop productivity,” the company said in a news release. “With professional-grade adhesion, elimination of micro-pinholes and industry-leading sanding properties, PRO Filler is a versatile system fit for any repair job.

The complete PRO Filler product line is available exclusively at NAPA Auto Parts stores:

PRO Lite lightweight body filler

PRO Grip premium lightweight body filler

PRO Strand short-strand fiberglass-reinforced

PRO Strand XL long-strand fiberglass-reinforced

PRO Gold finishing glaze & putty

PRO Spot 1k air-dry putty

“The complete PRO Filler line allows for seamless repair,” said Nick Dowling, product manager, Martin Senour. “It’s an asset in any job that requires a product with strong adhesion and smooth application.”

For more information regarding Martin Senour paint products and training opportunities, visit 

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/ or call 800-526-6704.

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      Selling shocks and struts simply comes down to knowledge, and sometimes it’s a little tricky because many of our customers confuse the difference between shocks, springs and struts. So, let’s start by clarifying the difference with information you can pass on the next time you get into the conversation across the counter.
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      Do I use them all the time? No. They’re not available for all vehicles, and in some cases on certain performance vehicles, the OE equipment is the best and only option for quality and customer satisfaction. You may have to do it the old-fashioned way.
      But for many applications – especially on older high-mileage vehicles – if the shock is completely worn out, you can bet the rest of the components are too, and it just makes sense. Sure, a lot of technicians like them because it makes the job much quicker and you don’t have to fight with a coil spring, but it more importantly gives you a big advantage in selling to DIYers, because most likely they don’t have the tools to compress the spring.
      Some final extras are sway-bar links, which often attach to a bracket on the strut housing. They’re often hard to remove and it’s probably a good time to replace them too. Shock absorbers should come with all needed hardware, and some shocks and struts are bushing-mounted at the bottom. As with any suspension bushings, these should be tightened with the vehicle at ride height to prevent premature wear of the bushing.
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