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Fatigue life prediction of rubber bushing in vehicle system

1.Response analysis of rubber bushing under random excitation The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the random excitation spectrum.

2. The fatigue life calculation of rubber bushing under random load can calculate the maximum strain energy density of rubber bushing under different excitation by using the response characteristics of rubber bushing under engine and road excitation obtained previously. The fatigue life of rubber bushing can be calculated under different load conditions. The maximum strain energy density U = 0.5134Nmm2 and the fatigue life N = 771371 were predicted under the excitation of engine speed n = 3000r/min and class B pavement, while U = 0.6893Nmm2, N, = 146774 under the excitation of engine speed n = 3000/min and class D pavement.(Thanks for the help and support of Chongqing Feilong Jiangli Auto Parts technical department.)

3. The test verification of the front sub-frame module is expensive because of the fatigue test of the whole vehicle system. Now the former sub-frame module is the research object, and the calculation results are compared with the test results. The front sub-frame is installed in accordance with its layout in the vehicle, and the six points connected with the body on the sub-frame are restrained. Sinusoidal excitation is carried out at the midpoint of the rear beam, and the maximum frequency which can be reached under the condition of satisfying the amplitude of the force is taken as the test frequency. The amplitude of force is 2.45.2kN. Fatigue failure criteria of rubber bushing: 2mm crack (equivalent to 20% of tensile coefficient).

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