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Power train mounting system NVH performance road test


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This power assembly mounting arrangement design uses more mature left, right engine side and transmission side three-point mounting arrangement, are rubber mounting. In the road test of NVH performance of mounting system, one measuring point (three-way sensor) is arranged on the active side (i.e. connecting engine side mounting bracket) and the passive side (i.e. connecting body side mounting bracket) of each mounting. The noise measuring points are located in the driver's right ear, the right ear of the non-left seat and the right ear of the rear left seat respectively. Set up a measuring point.

Under the condition of slow acceleration, the active and passive side brackets of the engine have obvious resonance bands around 260 Hz, and the maximum speed of the engine is about 3860 rpm.

Under the condition of slow acceleration, the sound pressure inside the vehicle has obvious peak value at about 3860rpm of the engine speed.

(Thanks to the engineers from Feilong Jiangli providing information)

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