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Axalta Introduces Chromatic Fan Decks to Help Automotive Enthusiasts Select Paint Color


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AxaltaAxalta has released a new set of chromatically sorted fan decks to help automotive enthusiasts easily find and select the right color for custom or overall refinishing projects.

The set, which is called SpectraMaster Color Family Effects, includes 80 fan decks with more than 3,000 colors for automotive projects that require a quality finish, according to Axalta. Colors range from vibrant whites to deep blacks with color families in between, including blues, greens, reds and more.

“Color selection is critical to automotive builders, restoration experts and others who are finishing an entire vehicle,” said Troy Weaver, vice president of Axalta Refinish North America. “Most often, they know which color family they want but need visual assistance to select the exact hue they’ve dreamed about. Our new SpectraMaster fan deck system can help by grouping like colors into fan decks that consumers can view and compare, indoors and out.”

To view SpectraMaster Color Family Fan Decks, automotive enthusiasts can visit their local paint distributor, who can help with color selection and mix the paint needed to complete the project.  Colors from the SpectraMaster set are available in several of Axalta’s leading waterborne and solventborne basecoats, including Cromax and Spies Hecker.

Find an Axalta automotive paint distributor near you by visiting axalta.us. Distributors who would like to order a SpectraMaster set can do so with part No. M-6624.

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