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Deloitte Survey: 7 In 10 Americans Prefer ICE Vehicles


Counterman
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In a recent Deloitte survey, 69% of Americans indicated that the internal-combustion engine (ICE) is their preferred powertrain for their next vehicle purchase.

As part of its 2022 Global Automotive Consumer Study, Deloitte surveyed more than 26,000 consumers in 25 countries to explore opinions regarding a variety of critical issues impacting the automotive sector, including the development of advanced technologies. Deloitte conducted the survey from September through October 2021.

The United States led the way in terms of consumer interest for ICE vehicles. In Southeast Asia, 66% of consumers said they prefer ICE powertrains over EVs for their next vehicle purchase, while 58% of survey respondents in China and India shared the same sentiment.

The survey found that consumer interest in battery electric vehicles is highest in South Korea (where 23% of respondents said they intend to buy one), China and Germany, while Japanese consumers prefer hybrid electric vehicles.

In the 2022 study, four key trends continued to emerge, according to Deloitte:

  1. Willingness to pay for advanced technologies remains limited.
  2. Interest in electric vehicles is driven by lower running costs and better experience.
  3. In-person purchase experiences are still preferred by many.
  4. Personal vehicles continue to be the preferred mode of transportation.

To download the full report, visit

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