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Wildfires a Serious Concern for Vehicles, Passengers


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As wildfires engulf the West, the non-profit Car Care Council reminds car owners to have their cabin air filters and engine air filters inspected and changed regularly to ensure they are providing maximum protection from smoke and debris.

“Cabin air filters are the first line of defense against contaminants that reduce vehicle cabin air quality for vehicle owners and their passengers,” said Nathan Perrine, executive director, Car Care Council. “The Car Care Council recommends that motorists in areas impacted by wildfires and those in surrounding states have their cabin air filters replaced. This simple, yet important, service will help ensure vehicle longevity as well as clean air inside the car.”

The cabin air filter is responsible for cleaning the air entering the passenger compartment. Under normal circumstances, it helps trap pollen, bacteria, dust and exhaust gases that may find their way into a vehicle’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system, compromising interior air quality and damaging the system. The filter also prevents leaves, bugs and other debris from entering the HVAC system, which could also cause problems.

Most cabin air filters are accessed through the panel in the HVAC housing, which may be under the hood or placed within the interior of the vehicle. A cabin air filter should not be cleaned and reinstalled. Instead, it should be replaced every 12,000 to 15,000 miles or per the owner’s manual.  In areas with heavy airborne contaminants, such as soot, smoke and debris from wildfires, it should be changed more frequently.

“It’s important not to overlook the engine air filter,” continued Perrine. “Engine air filters trap dirt particles, including soot, which can cause costly engine damage. They also plays a critical role in keeping smoke and debris from contaminating the airflow sensor on fuel-injected cars. As a rule of thumb, air filters should be inspected at each oil change and replaced annually or when showing other signs of contamination.”

To learn more about vehicle air filters, visit

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and view the “Air Filter Maintenance”
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on the Car Care Council’s YouTube channel at
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The non-profit Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For the latest car care news, visit the council’s online media room at

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. To order a free copy of the popular Car Care Guide, visit the council’s consumer education website at
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    • By Counterman
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    • By Counterman
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    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

    • By Counterman
      In our 2022 Distribution Preview in
      link hidden, please login to view, aftermarket leaders talk about some of the key issues affecting the industry, and discuss their plans, goals and expectations for the year ahead. This year, we added several fun “Lightning Round” questions that you won’t want to miss.
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