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Diagnostic Challenges That Can Elude an Experienced Technician


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Vehicles today incorporate a maze of electronic components that must be considered when troubleshooting a performance related symptom. A vast arsenal of test equipment is necessary to communicate with the electronic systems and components. Systems are so connected that it is difficult for the technician to distinguish between a mechanical, electrical, fuel or emission related […]

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