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Rislone Engine Treatment Available in Smaller Bottle


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Rislone Engine Treatment is moving to a more concentrated product in a smaller bottle.

In an effort to “offer customers greater versatility at a lower cost,” a 16.9-fluid-ounce bottle of Maximum Performance Engine Treatment (P/N 4102) replaces the quart size (P/N 100QR) in the Rislone lineup, according to Rislone.

“Quart sizes of engine additives were preferable when consumers bought individual quarts of oil for every oil change,” said Clay Parks, vice president of development for Rislone. “They could just swap a quart of oil for a quart of Engine Treatment. Now that they’re buying larger jugs of oil, we can replace the quart-size Engine Treatment with one that offers the same performance in a smaller, more cost-effective formula. Customers can add a full bottle of Rislone Engine Treatment at every oil change and can use it at any time to clean and stop engine noises, like a sticky lifter.”

American-made Rislone Engine Treatment is formulated to reduce engine friction and wear; quiet noisy lifters and valves; remove and prevent sludge; and keep engines clean, according to the company.

“The Rislone formula has evolved through the years to stay ahead of engine-oil technology,” the company said in a news release. “The new concentrated formula contains high-quality penetrating oil combined with protective engine additives and special cleaning agents to help motor oil flow freely, which provides engine protection over a broader temperature range and helps mitigate the effects of LSPI (low-speed pre-ignition) in newer direct-injection engines. Rislone Engine Treatment penetrates valve lifters, bearing surfaces, and piston rings to remove and prevent sludge and varnish.” 

The recommended dosage of Rislone Engine Treatment is one bottle for 4- to 6-quart systems in passenger cars and light trucks. For larger systems, such as for diesel trucks and stationary engines, one bottle treats every 5 quarts of oil capacity. It is compatible with conventional, high-mileage and synthetic engine oil in all gasoline, diesel and turbo engines.

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