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Niterra Adds More Coverage for Spark Plugs, Ignition Coils


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Niterra North America, formerly NGK Spark Plugs (U.S.A.), announced that it is expanding its coverage of spark plugs and ignition coils and adding 15 new part numbers to its line of spark plugs.

The new part numbers, sold under the company’s NGK brand of spark plugs, represent an increase in coverage for more than 6.5 million domestic and foreign vehicles in operation (VIO). Niterra also has added 12.9 million VIO of spark plug coverage and 10.6 million VIO of ignition-coil carry-forward coverage to its catalog. 

“The 15 new spark plug numbers fit a variety of 2012-2021 model vehicles across a broad spectrum of high-volume applications, many of them utilizing high-ignitability and precious metal technology designs,” said Mark Boyle, general manager – product OE & AM for Niterra North America. “NGK Spark Plugs is committed to application-coverage leadership and supplying service providers with our latest OEM technology, and we are excited to extend our category-leading spark plug designs and ignition-coil technologies into the aftermarket through these applications.”  

For more details about Niterra and the NGK spark plug and NTK product brands, visit 

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