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MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers to Present DEI Awards at AAPEX


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MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers will hold its annual  MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) Awards during AAPEX in Las Vegas.

MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers will present two awards – an Individual Award and a Company Award – to the winners on Nov. 1.

The awards were created to recognize the importance of DEI in the automotive and commercial-vehicle aftermarket and to celebrate those individuals and organizations who champion the spirit of DEI in their organizations and communities. Award winners will be selected from submissions made to MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers.

For Individual Award submissions, nominees should be influential leaders in the aftermarket who support, advance and/or embody the core values of DEI. Company Award nominees will be automotive and commercial-vehicle aftermarket organizations that have made achievements to advance DEI in the industry. Full nominee criteria and submission form can be found 

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“MEMA is dedicated to championing and advocating for a respectful, diverse, and collaborative community, and recognizing those within the industry that support that dedication,” said April Buford, executive director of DEI at MEMA. “The MEMA Aftermarket Suppliers DEI Awards will shine the light on one individual and one organization that are paving the way for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the automotive aftermarket.”

Applications for this year’s
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are due by Aug. 31.

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