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How to pick a good mechanic (and become a favorite customer)


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    • By Counterman
      Customers are the core of our business, and communicating with them effectively is critical to our success.
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      “The letter neither provides any proof that such a cyberattack on a vehicle has ever occurred nor explains why the NHTSA apparently has no actionable safety concerns regarding telematics being distributed to countless dealership garages across the country,”
      link hidden, please login to view. The newspaper also questions NHTSA’s rationale and due diligence supporting its assertions in the letter to the OEMS.
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      link hidden, please login to view to assuage NHTSA’s cybersecurity concerns, the newspaper laments that tweaking the Right to Repair law would require “more clarity on why telematics being sent to an independent mechanic constitutes a ‘safety defect’ while sending them to a dealer-affiliated garage doesn’t.” The newspaper concludes: “We hope Transportation Secretary Buttigieg and the NHTSA have some good answers, because the federal government should have a better reason than credulous alignment with big business to undermine Massachusetts’ voters and laws.”
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