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MINIEYE and Cyrus develop a whole set of perception system for ADAS


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MINIEYE recently announced that it and Xilinx (Inc) have developed a turnkey sensing system for ADAS. The two companies are working on creating solutions for car companies and first-class suppliers, and running MINIEYE IP on Sales Zynq-7000 and Zynq UltraScale + MPSoC platforms to achieve 1-3 self-driving.

According to Liu Guoqing, founder and CEO of MINIEYE, the new technology can identify and analyze more than 20 kinds of traffic targets, using the Sellings MPSoC platform. The scheme can realize signal input of cockpit exploration, target geophysical exploration and other sensors. This kind of function is designed to be applicable to complex automatic driving situations. After combining MINIEYE's algorithm with the advanced platform of Sales, the two sides hope that this scheme will help automobile companies and first-class suppliers to reduce R&D costs and improve their R&D efficiency.

MINIEYE can provide high-precision deep neuron network (DNN), make full use of Sellings vehicle-grade chips, while maintaining low power consumption. MINIEYE has installed the former market products into the major mainstream automobile companies'models.

This scheme can help users deploy differentiated visual algorithms. The software and hardware of Sellings on-chip system are programmable, and can be equipped with new features and functions for vehicles, aiming at meeting the NACP requirements of different countries.

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