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Jeep Wrangler Modification: Several Key Points You Need to Care


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Most people like Jeep Wrangler. However, the Jeep Wrangler seems to be a semi finished product. So, modifications are always tied to the Jeep Wrangler and every Wrangler looks different after the modification. It depends on the level of the technician and the appetite of the host of the “beast”. I didn’t see a completely same outlook on two Wranglers and I believe it won’t appear in the future. What I want to say today, is that the several key points that you need to keep an eye on when modifying a Jeep Wrangler.

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First of all, if you want to conquer the rugged or off-road surface with your Jeep Wrangler, you must heighten the chassis of the Wrangler. It is not hard to imagine what will happen if the chassis is not high enough when you cross a rugged road. Therefore, the outer diameter of the Jeep Wrangler tire I have seen can reach an incredible 48 inches. It almost is high enough for all road conditions.

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If you install the giant tires to heighten the chassis, the following question is the steering shock absorber. The original steer shock absorber can’t support such a large tire. When come across the big pits or big obstacles, you are hard to grab the steering wheel under the huge reaction force. That’s very dangerous. So, we must install a high damping shock absorber to solve this problem.

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After the safe-guarding modifications, the exterior parts of the Jeep Wrangler also should be considered, such as the front and rear bumpers. A high-strength front bumper will be your pioneer to explore the unknown world. And the rear bumper can keep a spare tire for you in case of emergency. The front bumpers and rear bumpers from Motorshive Exterior Auto Parts Online Store can solve this question perfectly.

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The American style is often linked to the wild, the tough shape, the symbol of the body, and the upgrade of the Black Spider Kit, further highlighting the muscles of the car. The appearance after the modification looks aggressive and awkward. It is necessary remind everyone warmly, your vehicle should not be too close to it.

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