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Hyundai Research and Development of the World's First Fingerprint Authentication System


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Hyundai announced on December 17 that it had developed a fingerprint authentication system that could be used to open doors and start cars.

The system allows drivers to open doors and start cars without keys using pre-registered fingerprints. Once the door handle sensor is touched, the driver's encrypted fingerprint data is transmitted to the controller inside the car, and the car is unlocked. The startup button in the car is also equipped with a fingerprint sensor, which can start the car by touching the button.

Chongqing Feilong Jiangli has some doubts. What about a car with more than one person? Can fake fingerprints start a car?

Rest assured, these situations can be solved by fingerprint authentication system. The system can adjust driver's seat position and rearview mirror to support personalized driving settings according to pre-registered fingerprints of multiple drivers. Hyundai will also add temperature and humidity control, steering wheel position adjustment and other functions in personalized settings.

The system is based on capacitance identification technology. It uses the capacitance difference caused by fingerprint touch and untouched components to distinguish users. Therefore, it is hardly affected by false fingerprints.

According to the company, the probability of the system identifying errors is only one in fifty thousand. In other words, it's almost five times as safe as an ordinary smart key. In addition, when the driver repeatedly uses the system, the system will learn in real time, thus reducing the error rate.

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      link hidden, please login to view and link hidden, please login to view social media pages or link hidden, please login to view. The three remaining engine-giveaway segments in this four-part promotion will take place in the months of July, August and October. Non-winning entries for a segment will roll into the subsequent entry segments, but participants are encouraged to enter the sweepstakes on both Facebook and Instagram with a unique photo for each entry segment.
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