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Rislone Hy-per Cool Radiator Cleaner Protects Cooling System


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Now part of the Rislone Hy-per premium performance-chemical family, Rislone Hy-per Cool Radiator Cleaner & Super Flush (p/n HFL400) is formulated to remove damaging coolant deposits that build up over time and cause engine overheating.

It also neutralizes acids and helps prevent the formation of scale deposits for longer system life. Its Heavy Duty Xtreme Clean formula cleans the entire cooling system, removing solder bloom, oily residue, rust and scale.

“One of the unique elements of Rislone Hy-per Cool Radiator Cleaner & Super Flush is that it includes a water pump lubricant and inhibitors that protect the water pump during cleaning,” explains Clayton Parks, vice president of strategic development for Rislone. “This helps prevent other coolant-related issues from developing due to the flushing process.”

Rislone Hy-per Cool Radiator Cleaner & Super Flush is fast, easy and safe to use in all cooling systems. It removes deposits and coolant gel for a complete cleaning in about 30 minutes. Another benefit: Clean systems run cooler. Customers can use Super Flush every time coolant is changed, whether for light system flushing or heavy-duty cleaning. Rislone recommends treating systems of up to 16 quarts with one 16-ounce (473-millileter) bottle. 

For best results, add a bottle of Rislone Hy-per Cool Super Coolant when refilling the system to deliver optimal heat transfer performance.

Like all Rislone Hy-per products, Radiator Cleaner & Super Flush is made in the U.S.A. For a limited time, get a $5 mail-in rebate with every purchase of Rislone Hy-per Cool Radiator Cleaner. Visit 

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Check out Rislone Hy-per Cool Radiator Cleaner & Super Flush, as well as the full Rislone lineup, in booth 3616 at AAPEX, Nov. 1-3, 2022 at the Venetian Expo in Las Vegas.

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    • By Counterman
      Rislone has introduced new High Mileage Power Steering Stop Whine with Leak Repair (P/N 4604), describing it as “a quick and dependable solution for customers suffering steering ‘whine,’ sluggish steering or a power-steering system leak in their high-mileage cars, SUVs and light trucks.” 
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    • By Counterman
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    • By Counterman
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      To further illustrate the advantage of an electronically controlled thermostat, consider traditional (old-school) thermostat operation. As the engine warms up, the radiator and hoses remain cold. When monitoring cooling-system performance as a technician, it’s common to keep a hand wrapped around the upper radiator hose. It stays cold until the thermostat opens; then it gets hot really quickly as the coolant flows from the engine into the radiator.
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      Electric Vehicles
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      You also can throw in some valving and a high-voltage coolant heater to boost heater-core output, plus a completely different cooling circuit for the batteries, power inverter, transaxle and electric motor. The good news for us? There’s a lot more to fix and a lot more parts to sell.
      So, when will they start to call it a PHMS? And I’m waiting for the day of GPS-monitored temperature-sensing microchips that float around the cooling system, reporting the exact temperature of the coolant along the way. Sound crazy? Probably. But if it ever happens, just remember where you heard it first.
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    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

    • By Mali
      FORD 974F 8A641 AB Pulley, radiator fan required
      link hidden, please login to view Can you recommend a seller that I can buy wholesale and at a reasonable price?
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