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Continental Upgrades ‘Make Power Smart’ App


Counterman

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Following a successful first year, Continental’s “Make Power Smart” app is announcing a new version of the app that will include updates and enhancements for the user.

The app also will be available for download in Europe for Android and iOS. 

Updates and improvements include: 

  • User registration – Allows users to sign up and manage drive systems properly for a better customer experience 
  • Multiple languages – The app now is available in English, German, French, Spanish and Italian.
  • Belt ID –Allows forselection of the belt category and access to the product specification page for an easy identification and application 
  • Drive calculation – Easily calculate and select a belt for a two-pulley system. This latest version of the app provides a more complete product range of V-belts and timing belts for North America(previously it was only possible to calculate drives based on the Synchrochain Carbon).
  • Tension2Go –The ability tomeasure the tension value of a drive system in a very fast, easy and intuitive way
  • Pulley-center distance – The ability to measure the diameter of the pulley, the center distance and the wrapping angle from a picture 

“At Continental, we are always looking for new and improved ways to provide value to our customers,” said Jenelle Ogburn, head of Americas Industrial Distribution, Power Transmission Group. “The Make Power Smart app has been a successful step of launching into the digital age to help our customers do work easily and effectively, and we’re excited to enhance the user experience and grow the app outside of the North American market.”

The app allows users to get a digital and interactive analysis of a belt with just a few clicks on their smartphone. It also provides important data on the drive condition, enabling users to improve the belt drives themselves on the site – with all of the tools needed on one easily accessible app.  

The Make Power Smart app originally was conceived as part of Continental’s internal innovation competition and later was chosen as the winner. It originally launched in summer 2021 and has consistently received positive reviews from customers.

The app is available for download in the AppStore and Playstore. In case you already have the app installed on your mobile device, please update it to the latest version that’s available now.

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