Quantcast
Jump to content
  • Welcome to Auto Parts Forum

    Whether you are a veteran automotive parts guru or just someone looking for some quick auto parts advice, register today and start a new topic in our forum. Registration is free and you can even sign up with social network platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Google, and LinkedIn. 

     

Does anyone know how to install the front grille for Toyota Tacoma below?


Recommended Posts

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Similar Topics

    • By NAPA
      In some ways electric vehicles are just like any other vehicle on the road. Wheels are powered to move passengers from one place to another along a roadway. It’s the same basic principle that carried us past the days of the horse and buggy. In fact many of the early horseless carriages were actually electric powered. But modern electric vehicles deal in much higher voltages and amperages than anything on the road in the past few decades. Anyone who already works on internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles probably has a link hidden, please login to view, but when it comes to servicing hybrid and electric vehicles (EV) there are a few more things to consider. Let’s take a look at EV tools versus ICE tools and learn what you might need for your EV tool kit.
      Hand Tools
      Starting with hand tools the functions are pretty much the same. A screwdriver still has a handle and a tip, wrenches still have jaws, sockets still have six or twelve points. The big difference comes down to stopping the flow of electricity either through the tool or to the user. You’ve probably seen insulated tools before, likely a screwdriver in a set. These are pretty common for household electrical work. But did you know there are insulated tools and then there are non-conductive (composite) tools? 
      An insulated tool is typically made of metal (like a normal tool) which is then covered with a non-conductive substance like epoxy or rubber. This interrupts the flow of electricity from the tool to the user’s hand. But insulated tools need to be checked regularly to verify if the insulating coating is still intact. Some tools use different colored insulation layers to signal if a tool is ready for replacement. If the warning layer is visible, the tool is no longer safe to use. The last point is one that normally isn’t a part of hand tool ownership. Hand tools either work or they are broken. Insulated electric tools may still technically work as say a wrench, but they will not be safe to use around electrical components once the insulation has been compromised. 
      Composite tools are actually made differently than normal tools. For example a composite ratchet will have a handle made completely of a strong non-conductive material with no metal inside. This prevents electricity from traveling from the head of the ratchet to the user’s hand. Composite sockets will still have a metal hex insert, but that metal is attached to a strong non-conductive composite, and then to the square drive. The non-conductive material breaks the circuit and blocks the flow of electricity. 
      Diagnostic Tools
      Working on any modern vehicle requires the right diagnostic equipment regardless of the power source. While a
      link hidden, please login to viewworking on an electric vehicle won’t be diagnosing ignition or emissions problems, they will be chasing down other normal issues like bad sensors or damaged modules. But one difference in EV tools vs. ICE tools is the power handling capability of the electric vehicle diagnostic tool. For example any link hidden, please login to viewintended to be used on an electric vehicle must be rated CAT III to handle the high voltages often found inside these vehicles. Likewise the link hidden, please login to view need to be also rated for higher voltage use. While internal combustion engines are starting to use 48-volt systems in areas, some electric vehicles operate in the hundreds of volts so special EV diagnostic tools are a must. Shop Tools
      Your shop may already be well equipped to work on common internal combustion vehicles, but there are some special electric vehicle repair tools you may need to consider. For example, your two-post lift likely needs different footpads to correctly lift electric vehicles. You also need to make sure your lift can be configured to handle different vehicle weight biases (front to rear) for balanced lifting. Speaking of lifting, many electric vehicle and hybrid batteries weigh a considerable amount and are mounted to the bottom of the vehicle. Safely removing one of these batteries should be left up to a specialized lifting table designed for the task.
      Most people are not aware that air conditioning compressors used in hybrid and electric vehicles have a special type of oil that is designed to be non-conductive. That means you will need an
      link hidden, please login to view that can prevent cross-contamination between systems. Considering that the air conditioning compressor on a hybrid or electric vehicle is powered by a high-power electric motor rather than an engine pulley, the different oil requirement makes sense. Safety Equipment
      It’s a good idea to wear gloves when working on any vehicle, but when working on an electric or hybrid vehicle it is mandatory. Specifically
      link hidden, please login to view designed to handle high voltage. Gloves must also be tested before each use for any tears/cuts/leaks/wear that might allow a path for electricity to travel. A good pair of ASTM F 2413-11 safety boots with EH (electrical hazard) rating is also recommended. It is also important to let others know when a technician is working on a hybrid or electric vehicle. Placing
      link hidden, please login to view around the bay and a line of link hidden, please login to view signals to others that the vehicle is not to be approached. The safety gear worn by the technician is only designed to protect one person, all others must keep their distance during servicing of electric vehicle components. Any shop that is considering working on electric or hybrid vehicles needs an insulated rescue hook. In the unfortunate event of a technician suffering an accident while working on an electrical component the insulated rescue hook allows the victim to be pulled away from the electrical source without endangering the rescuer. This also means that a technician should never work on a hybrid or electric vehicle alone, there should always be another person present in the shop.
      Lastly anyone attempting to service an electric or hybrid vehicle should be properly trained. Old fashioned “on the job” training may be fine for most maintenance procedures on a normal car, the same cannot be said for electric or hybrid vehicles. The potential power output of an EV battery is just too high to risk working on a vehicle without at least basic training. Luckily
      link hidden, please login to viewcan help anyone acquire the right training they need to become a successful technician capable of handling electric and hybrid vehicles. The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By NAPA
      It should come as no surprise that car batteries not only come in all shapes and sizes, but also in various electrical capacities. This makes sense because the wide variety of vehicle sizes and types in use make it unlikely that a single battery can serve every application. But does car battery size matter? And what if you are wondering what size battery for my car is best? Let’s take a look at why car batteries are different sizes and what car battery sizes you might find under the hood of most cars, trucks, SUVs and vans.
      Why Are Car Batteries Different Sizes?
      The very earliest cars used batteries of various sizes with no standards whatsoever. Battery manufacturers simply made batteries the way they wanted and car makers picked whatever fit. But then the Battery Council International (BCI) was formed and battery sizes started to fall in line with the standards set forth by the BCI. This helped simplify and standardize automotive engineering designs with common battery tray sizes as well as power output measurements.
      Common Car Battery Sizes
      Over the years car manufacturers figured out it was easier to just stick to a few common battery sizes to use across their production lines. The car battery size chart below lists out the dimensions of the most common car battery sizes:
      GROUP NO. NAPA PART NO.
      LENGTH (inches) WIDTH (inches) HEIGHT (inches) 24 8424 10-3/4 6-3/4 9 24F 8424F 10-3/4 6-3/4 9 25 8425 9-3/4 6-7/8 8-7/8 27 8427 12 6-3/4 9 34 8434 10-3/4 6-7/8 8 34R 8434R 10-3/4 6-7/8 8 35 8435 9-9/16 6-7/8 8-7/8 41 (T65) 8441 11-9/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 42/58R 8442 10 7-1/4 6-7/8 47 (H5/L2) 8447 9-9/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 48 (H6/L3) 8448 11 6-7/8 7-1/2 49 (H8/L5) 8449 13-15/16 6-7/8 7-1/2 55 8456 8-3/4 6 8-1/2 58 8458 10 7-1/4 6-7/8 65 8465 12 7-3/8 7-5/8 75 8475 9-3/4 7 7-1/4 78 8478 10-3/4 6-7/8 7-1/4 86 8486 9 6-7/8 8-1/8 96R 8496R 9-9/16 6-7/8 6-7/8 99R (T4) 8499R 8-1/4 6-7/8 6-7/8 75/86 (DT) 8425/75 9-3/4 7 8-1/8 34/78 (DT) 8434/78 10-3/4 6-7/8 8 That may look like a long list of car battery sizes, but there are actually many more in use around the world. A more inclusive battery size chart for cars, trucks, SUVs and other vehicles can be found in the
      link hidden, please login to view. Size Isn’t The Only Factor link hidden, please login to view
      Looking at the above car battery sizes chart you may notice that some batteries are physically the same size, but that doesn’t mean they are interchangeable. The location of the positive and negative battery terminals, the battery case mounting provisions, and the type of battery terminal connections are all important factors.
      There are also differences in battery capacity. The cranking amp (CA) capacity and cold cranking amp (CCA) capacity are both important factors in matching a battery with a vehicle’s needs. The CA and CCA both refer to the amount of amps available to start the vehicle at a certain temperature. Then there is the reserve capacity (RC) of the battery which is how long a battery can deliver 25 amps of power until it is drained down to 10.5 volts. 
      What Is The Right Battery Size For My Car?
      If you are trying to find the right battery size for your car then the answer is the size that your vehicle’s manufacturer designed it to use. Trying to shoehorn in a bigger battery may sound like a good idea, but if the battery mount can’t hold it securely then you may end up with a big headache. Likewise picking a smaller battery than specified could lead to electrical issues if it can’t handle the electrical load. It may also rattle around in the battery tray leading to a shorter battery life or even a dangerous short circuit. And even if the car battery group size chart says a battery physically fits, it may be the wrong capacity or voltage. Trust the engineers that designed the vehicle and only replace the battery with an exact size unit. You can change your car battery yourself if you have the
      link hidden, please login to view, or let the experts at your link hidden, please login to view handle it for you. The post
      link hidden, please login to view appeared first on link hidden, please login to view.
      link hidden, please login to view
    • By OReilly Auto Parts
      How To: Change the Cabin Air Filter in a 2010 to 2015 Toyota Prius
    • By OReilly Auto Parts
      How To: Change the Air Filter in a 2010 to 2015 Toyota Prius
    • Up to 50% OFF
    • By OReilly Auto Parts
      How To: Change the Cabin Air Filter In a 2003 to 2009 Toyota Prius
×
  • Create New...