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Bar’s Leaks Celebrates 75th Anniversary


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 Bar’s Leaks celebrates its 75th anniversary in 2022.

“What started as a single radiator stop-leak formula in 1947 has grown into America’s most-trusted stop-leak brand,” the company said in a news release.

Over the last 75 years, 

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 products have sealed more than 400 million vehicle-fluid leaks and prevented countless more, saving American consumers billions of dollars in repair bills, the company added.

“When a Bar’s Leaks product gets someone back on the road, it doesn’t just save them money, it can also save their day,” explained Clay Parks, vice president of product development. “By stopping more than 400 million leaks, Bar’s Leaks has saved millions of vacations, workdays and date nights. We’ve made it possible to win races, keep appointments and explore the world.” 

Bar’s Leaks debuted as a radiator stop-leak invented by Fred Barton in 1947. Today, the Bar’s Leaks brand encompasses stop-leak and repair products for a wide range of vehicle components and systems including cooling, engine, gearbox, hydraulics, power steering, transmission and more. Common applications include cars, trucks, and SUVs; motorcycles and other recreational vehicles; lawnmowers; boats and other watercraft; and agricultural equipment. 

The original Bar’s Leaks customers were U.S. automakers that installed it in every car they made to prevent coolant seepage. In 1950, Bar’s Leaks entered the traditional automotive aftermarket, including repair garages. In 1965, distribution was expanded to the retail automotive aftermarket. Today, Bar’s Leaks products are available through distribution and leading retailers nationwide, both online and in person. 

The Bar’s Leaks advanced chemical engineering team has continuously improved the product line to maintain pace with evolutions in vehicle design, updating formulas and introducing innovative new products to help drivers keep their cars on the road. The 1996 introduction of engine, transmission and power-steering repair solutions was a significant step beyond cooling-system stop-leaks.

In 2004, Bar’s Leaks revolutionized the automotive repair industry with its new Head Gasket Repair – a chemical solution for blown head gaskets that stopped leaks by repairing the root cause and forming a bond stronger than the actual head gasket itself, according to the company. The brand got a little sparkle with the introduction of Liquid Copper Block Seal, a metallic antifreeze-compatible stop-leak for large cooling-system leaks, in 2008. It was followed in 2010 with the strongest professional-grade, antifreeze-compatible head-gasket sealant Bar’s Leaks has developed: Head Seal Blown Head Gasket Repair.

Recognizing that consumers are increasingly pressed for time, and retailers are pressed for shelf space, in 2019 Bar’s Leaks rolled out Super Leak Fix, the first all-in-one product to stop engine, transmission, power-steering, hydraulic and gear/axle leaks, according to the company. Most recently, last year Bar’s Leaks introduced Gear Repair, the industry’s first treatment designed to extend gear-system life, stop leaks, reduce noise and improve gear performance in automotive, heavy-duty, agricultural, marine and industrial gear oils. 

Bar’s Leaks prides itself on making easy-to-use, effective products that can turn regular people into “three-minute mechanics” who can use the products to get back on the road quickly, easily, and inexpensively. To this end, Bar’s Leaks products feature extensive instructions and usage information directly on the bottles. Additional product resources, including installation videos, technical videos, FAQs, product data sheets and more are available on the website at 

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. Customer support from Bar’s Leaks product experts in Michigan is available at the website, through 
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, or by phone at 800-345-6572. 

All Bar’s Leaks products are proudly made in the United States. Based in Holly, Michigan, Bar’s Leaks is an ISO 9001-certified company.

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