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Alligator TPMS Sensors Offer Coverage For 2020-2021 Ford Bronco


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Alligator sens.it RS universal TPMS sensors now cover the 2020-2021 Ford Bronco.

“This vehicle has hit the market by storm and Alligator is proud to offer service for this impressive new SUV,” Alligator said in a news release.

The all-terrain Bronco is another addition to the expanding list of Ford vehicles that can automatically learn and detect TPMS sensors once installed into each wheel assembly, or if rotating tires at regular intervals.

Alligator offers these instructions: Simply install the new Alligator sens.it RS universal TPMS sensors, then begin driving the SUV, and the system will register the new IDs automatically while driving. Based on the instruction manual, make sure to park the vehicle the required amount of time for the TPMS system to enter into relearn mode (usually 20 minutes).

The Alligator sens.it RS universal TPMS sensor also supports location detection, so when rotating tires, there’s no need to reset the system manually. Simply follow the same procedure as auto-learning and the display will show the new tire locations on the dash after driving for a few minutes.

“By continuing to use Alligator sens.it RS universal TPMS sensors, shops can ensure they are working with a part that supports the full range of OE features, which helps make the job easier, reduces unnecessary downtime in the bay for TPMS learning or general sensor issues, helps the bottom line and, most importantly, keeps customers happy and coming back,” the company said. “When replacing OEM sensors with aftermarket sensors, rest assured that RS Series TPMS sensors from Alligator will provide all the functionality your car delivers. Regardless of the tool you use to program your Alligator TPMS sensors, this new application should be available for programming after you complete the latest update.”

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      link hidden, please login to view. “However, many of them were replaced, because back then the vehicles didn’t have onboard diagnostic capabilities. Usually after mechanics and DIYers had replaced all the other ignition parts and sensors, the MAF sensor was the last-ditch effort.” These days, you’re more likely to encounter the hot-wire style of MAF sensor. The hot-wire MAF sensor is smaller, faster and more accurate than the older vane-type MAF sensor, making it the preferred choice in most late-model vehicles.
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