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Continental Highlights Line Of ATE Replacement Brake Fluids


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Continental’s line of ATE replacement brake fluids feature special formulations designed to help maximize brake-system performance in all types of electronic, hydraulic and racing systems.

The full line includes ATE Super DOT 5.1, the technological standard for brake fluids; ATE SL.6 Brake Fluid, the ideal replacement for ESP, ABS and ASR electronic brake systems; ATE SL for hydraulic brake and clutch systems; and ATE TYP 200 for high-performance and racing applications.

ATE Super DOT 5.1 Premium Brake Fluid’s formulation sets a new performance standard for brake fluids, according to Continental. It combines a high wet boiling point of 356 F with outstanding viscosity at very low temperatures to deliver a capability that previous brake fluids were unable to achieve. With a maximum of 750 mm²/sec. at minus 40 F, ATE Super DOT 5.1 viscosity values exceed even those of ISO Class 6, which are well above the specifications for DOT 5.1 class brake fluids, according to the company.

ATE SL.6 brake fluidis the optimum replacement for DOT 4 fluid in ESP, ABS and ASR brake systems. Its low-viscosity texture allows electronic brake systems to react more quickly for improved safety. ATE SL.6 offersexcellent application coverage for the advanced braking systems used in high-end vehicle makes and models.

ATE SL brake fluidis an excellent DOT 4 replacement for use as hydraulic fluid in brake and clutch systems. It features a mixture of polyethylene glycol ethers, polyethylene glycols and boric acid esters of polyethylene glycols with anti-corrosion/anti-aging agents. ATE SL meets and exceeds the requirements of the brake-fluid standards FMVSS-No. 116 – DOT 4, SAE J1704 and ISO 4925, Class 4, among others.

ATE TYP 200 brake fluid exceeds all DOT 4 standards and excels under the extreme demands of high-performance driving. Compatible with all DOT 3, DOT 4 and DOT 5.1 brake fluids, the formula delivers a minimal drop in boiling point due to outstanding water-binding properties that result in a long-lasting fluid that can provide optimal performance for up to three years under normal highway driving conditions, according to Continental. The high wet and dry boiling points make this fluid an excellent choice for street-driven vehicles as well.

“ATE brake fluids are the result of many years of experience and expertise in developing OE brake systems,” notes Dan Caciolo, head of product management at Continental. “The viscosity, boiling point and pressure behavior of our fluids interact perfectly to allow the braking system to react quickly and reliably in any application. Our boiling points and viscosity exceed legal specifications, while our high-quality additives help deliver outstanding corrosion protection and optimum compatibility with brake system’s sealing materials.”

ATE is an aftermarket brand of Continental. For more information, visit

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