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Engine overheating or undercooling hazards


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Automobile engine is a kind of machine which provides power for automobile, and it is the heart of automobile. It affects the power, economy and environmental protection of automobile. According to different power sources, automotive engines can be divided into diesel engine, gasoline engine, electric vehicle motor and hybrid power.

Engine overheating will cause the following hazards to the car:

1) reduce inflation efficiency and reduce engine power.

2) the tendency of early combustion and deflagration increases, resulting in early damage to parts due to additional impact loads.

3) the normal clearance (thermal expansion and cold contraction) of the moving parts is destroyed, the movement block, the wear aggravate, or even damage.

4) the deterioration of lubrication aggravates the friction and wear of parts.

5) the mechanical properties of parts are reduced, resulting in deformation or damage.

And if the engine is too cold, it will also do harm to cars.

1) When the temperature of the mixture (or air) entering the cylinder is too low, the quality of the combustible mixture is poor (poor atomization), which makes it difficult to ignite or slow combustion, resulting in a decrease in engine power, an increase in fuel consumption (excessive heat loss, fuel condensation into the crankcase).

2) Water vapor in combustion products easily condenses into water and forms acids with acidic gases, which aggravates the erosion of the body and parts.

3) Unvaporized fuel scouring and diluting the oil film on the surface of parts (cylinder wall, piston, piston ring, etc.), which aggravates the wear of parts. 4) Increased viscosity of lubricating oil, poor fluidity, resulting in poor lubrication, worsening parts wear and power consumption.

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      link hidden, please login to view At the risk of sounding partial to the classics, I’m going to say I miss those days. The majority of the engine blocks were clearly visible, and air cleaners, brackets, braces and pulleys all had a nice finish, only to be topped aesthetically on performance models with chrome-plated air cleaners or valve covers.
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