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Continental Introduces Analog High-Definition Camera Systems


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Continental has expanded its line of vehicle camera systems.

Continental’s new Platform AHD (analog high-definition) camera systems are designed to enhance the driver’s view and improve fleet efficiency.

Built to support drivers when navigating complex situations such as tight warehouse aisles, busy constructions sites or crowded shipping facilities, these camera systems provide vehicle operators with the extended visibility they need to get a better view of their surroundings and make their operations safer, according to the company.

Continental’s AHD camera systems feature 2-megapixel cameras with high image clarity and infrared lights for enhanced night vision. The camera line includes rear-view and front- and side-view cameras. The displays work with both CVBS and AHD camera inputs. Video can be stored in a DVR for future driver analysis and training.

Offered with 7-inch and 10.1-inch AHD displays, the AHD camera systems can integrate seamlessly with Continental ultrasonic sensors to deliver back up detection that warns the operator of obstacles behind the vehicle. The cameras feature IP 67 enclosures that are waterproof and dust-tight. The systems are available with dual voltage (12-volt and 24-volt) and offered in different cables sizes.

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