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Mevotech Adds Wheel Hubs To Supreme Product Line


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Mevotech recently announced the expansion of its Supreme product line to include wheel-hub assemblies.

According to the company, features include:

  • Roll form lockdown design – to ensure bearing preload for reduced vibration
  • Premium seals – with a three-point or four-point seal design
  • Reinforced ABS sensor – enhanced wiring harness with integrated strain reliefs
  • Premium lithium synthetic grease – resistant to wear, high temperature and extreme pressure
  • Increased flange thickness – with 20% more material to reduce flex while the hub is turning
  • Maximized contact angle – for improved resistance to radial loads
  • Optimized axial play – to ensure negative clearance fully loaded, reducing vibration
  • Premium materials – featuring high-precision rolling elements encapsulated in a fiber reinforced cage

Plus, there’s no wasting bay time and money sourcing the right mounting hardware or looking up torque specs. Supreme hubs come with “labor-saver” additions to make the professional technician’s job faster and easier, so all mounting hardware and precise torque specs are included in the box for a complete install, according to Mevotech.

“As part of the Supreme Hubs launch, we are introducing 27 new upgraded SKUs for the most popular applications. They feature engineered enhancements based on key failure points to prevent costly comebacks and keep vehicles performing strongly,” said Richard Stothers, vice president engineering & research.

Designed with application-specific upgrades, Mevotech Supreme parts are engineered to provide increased strength, durability and service life for high-usage passenger cars, CUVs, SUVs and fleet vehicles. Joining Supreme ball joints, control arms, tie-rod ends and stabilizer links, this fifth core product offering means the professional technician now can choose engineered steering, suspension and wheel-end replacement components for a complete repair solution, the company noted.

For more information, visit the Mevotech

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