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Autodiagnos TPMS SE Works With 100% Of OE, Aftermarket Sensors


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Continental offers the Autodiagnos TPMS SE service tool as an ideal solution for multiple-bay shops that want to increase their TPMS-service capabilities and profits.

Designed to work with 100% of OE sensors and aftermarket sensors from REDI Sensor and EZ-sensor, Autodiagnos TPMS SE can perform relearns on over 95% of domestic, Asian and European models, according to the company.  

The Autodiagnos TPMS SE was developed for multi-bay shops that require more than one TPMS tool in service at a time. It provides direct (OBD, auto, manual) and indirect TPMS relearn procedures and displays sensor ID, pressure, temperature and battery status in a matter of seconds. The tool also utilizes a cabled connection to perform OBD II mode relearns.

“Diagnostic tools can offer great service opportunities for shops, but often come with a hefty price tag. The Autodiagnos TPMS SE tool is an affordable option that allows larger shops to provide critical TPMS service to multiple customers simultaneously,” said Christopher Bahlman, head of diagnostics and services for Continental. “Plus, the tool is backed by Continental’s TPMS and OEM expertise, giving technicians peace of mind when servicing this critical safety system.”

In addition to the Autodiagnos TPMS SE, Continental also offers the Autodiagnos TPMS D tool as a solution for shops that only need a single tool for their service and diagnostic needs. This tool reads and clears TPMS codes and has a built-in VIN scanner for faster make/model/year lookups. It also can program sensors from historical data and features an OBD II mode that streamlines relearns for all of a vehicle’s sensors in under two minutes. The TPMS D works with 100% of OE and aftermarket sensors from REDI Sensor and EZ-sensor, according to Continental.

Continental Diagnostics & Services (D&S) was founded nearly 10 years ago to address the needs of service providers for advanced diagnostics, service information, connected services and specialty solutions, such as PTI (periodic technical inspection). D&S has developed diagnostics and service solutions for North America under the Autodiagnos brand. Key product offerings include professional aftermarket scan tools, TPMS diagnostic and service tools and a connected-vehicle data platform.

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      To learn more about a supplier partnership, membership or access to some of the innovative projects that NEXUS Automotive International has introduced to the market, visit its website at
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      link hidden, please login to viewand link hidden, please login to viewrefractometers but they both work on the same idea. Simply place a few sample drops of coolant in the tool. For the analog refractometer you then look through the eyepiece and read the inside gauge. For the digital refractometer you just have to push a button and the reading will be displayed on the screen. You will need to read the instructions and be familiar with the tool to understand what the results of each one means to the specific gravity of your coolant. Testing Engine Coolant Condition
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      How To Pressure Test A Coolant System
      Luckily learning how to pressure test coolant system components is pretty easy. You will need an
      link hidden, please login to view which looks like a bicycle tire pump attached to a universal radiator cap. Start with a cool engine (never work on a hot engine cooling system under pressure). Remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap if so equipped. Attach the pressure tester to the same place where you just removed the radiator cap or reservoir cap. The pressure tester may have a universal rubber fitting or come with an array of adapters to connect with your particular cooling system. Now use the pump to add pressurized air to the cooling system. Watch the pressure gauge on the pressure tester and add roughly 15 psi of pressure (but no more than that). The pressure gauge should hold steady indicating no leaks. If the pressure gauge goes down or does not register any pressure, double check your pressure tester connection just in case. If the system will not hold pressure, you will need to repair the leak. You can use link hidden, please login to view to help locate the leak if it is not easily apparent. Check out all the
      link hidden, please login to view available on link hidden, please login to view or trust one of our 17,000 link hidden, please login to view for routine maintenance and repairs. For more information on how to test engine coolant sensor output and other cooling system parts, chat with a knowledgeable expert at your link hidden, please login to view. The post
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      As with every tool-software release, Bartec is continuously developing aftermarket-sensor coverage, while improving tool features and functions. This release will enable diagnostic functionality for Tesla models and adds the brand-new TPMS replacement sensor Rite-Sensor Blue.
      According to Bartec, tool-software development requires collating huge amounts of data from industry partners, developing the necessary code based on that data, then thoroughly testing and vetting the solution before releasing it to customers. Bartec is an OE-based provider and understands the critical part that testing plays in developing and releasing software, the company noted.   
      Release 65.0 is for older TPMS tools Tech400Pro, Tech300Pro and Tech500. Release 5.0 covers the TechRITEPro, Tech450Pro, Tech550Pro and Tech600Pro. Both versions contain additional OBD II coverage as well as additional model-year 2023 coverage.
      To update your Bartec TPMS tools, first make sure your software access is current. The easiest way to do that is download Bartec’s free application, TPMS Desktop. The TPMS Desktop is a tool-management utility that helps with tool updating, vehicle lookup and coverage as well as inspection-report retrieval and printing. If you’re an existing TPMS Desktop user, it will update automatically. If you don’t yet have TPMS Desktop, visit Bartec USA’s website at
      link hidden, please login to view and click on the link to download. A complete technical service Bbulletin describing all the contents of software update 65.0/5.0 is now available for download at
      link hidden, please login to view or from the TPMS Desktop. To download and install this update, you must have a current software subscription. Check your account at link hidden, please login to view and call your Bartec distributor to purchase an update certificate. For more information, call Bartec USA at 855-877-9732 or visit the website at
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