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Do you know the water pump?


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    image.png.a5ddd67ab741d784bc41cde3599dd4c0.png

    Centrifugal pumps are widely used in automobile engines. The basic structure consists of a pump house, a connecting plate or a belt pulley, a water pump shaft and a bearing or shaft bearing, a pump impeller and a water seal, etc., The water pump is the main component of the automobile.

    The engine drives the pump bearing and the impeller rotation through the belt pulley, while the pump coolant is driven together by the impeller rotation. Under the action of centrifugal force, the coolant is flung to the edge of the water pump house, which creates a certain pressure and then flows out of the channel or water pipe.

    When the coolant is thrown out, the pressure at the center of the impeller is reduced. The coolant in the water tank is sucked into the impeller by the water pipe under the difference pressure between the pump inlet and the impeller center to realize the reciprocating cycle of the cooling liquid.

    The grease which should be prevented from the leakage of coolant is used for lubricating on the shaft bearings. The grease leakage should be prevented at the same time. The seals and gaskets are used for preventing leakage of water pump.

    If you need the water pump, please contact me [email protected]. It’s my pleasure to offer service for you.

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      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

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