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Gila: Window Tinting Guide


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    • By Counterman
      MAHLE Motorsport has announced the availability of the company’s new 2023 Application Guide.
      The 38-page application guide features all of the company’s high-performance PowerPak piston sets and Pro Series Race pistons and provides complete product information for seven new PowerPak sets in addition to multiple new rings, pins and rails. 
      A sample of the new PowerPak piston sets available for 2023 include the Ford Godzilla 7.3-liter PowerPak; SBC 22°/23° Flat Top Gasported PowerPak; Forged SBC 23° USRA-approved PowerPak with press-fit pins; SBC 22° ASCS 360 Sprint Dome gas ported with asymmetrical valve pockets; LS 5.3L (Gen 4) Flat Top drop-in forged replacement assembly compatible with LS1/2/6 style cathedral port heads; Big Block Mopar 440 Dish; and a BB Mopar 383/400 Flat Top and Ford 5.0-liter Modular Coyote (Gen 3) Direct Injected (2018+).
      Also, new cast piston PowerPak sets are available for the Ford Powerstroke including a 6.0-liter piston set that also is offered with 0.100-inch deep valve pockets, and a Ford 6.4-liter Powerstroke available with 0.10-inch-deep valve pockets. 
      MAHLE Motorsport PowerPak piston sets provide engine builders with their best value based on a reputation of reliability, durability and added features, according to the company. Most PowerPak sets come complete with a high-performance ring set with pins and clips. Also, the pistons are dual coated with a phosphate dry lubricant to reduce friction and GRAFAL skirt coating to reduce drag and skirt fatigue. 
      The PowerPak sets featured in the guide include a broad selection of SBC, LS, BBC, SBF, Ford Modular PowerPaks and a growing list of Hemi, Powerstroke and Diesel PowerPak sets. MAHLE Motorsport also offers PowerPak sets for many imports and sport compacts including Mazda, Subaru, Nissan, Ford EcoBoost, BMW, Audi, VW and Toyota applications. The guide also includes a section on ring gap instructions with illustrations and samples based on the high-performance street, circle track/drag racing, turbo/supercharger, diesel turbocharged and more. 
      The new application guide is available to download now at 
      link hidden, please login to view, or can be picked up at the 2022 PRI show at booth No. 1601. The post
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    • By Counterman
      In the October issue of AMN/Counterman, we talked about the Automotive Sales Council’s
      link hidden, please login to view – an initiative that aims to reduce the sky-high return rate in the automotive aftermarket. Members of the Automotive Sales Council include representatives from KYB, Dorman Products, FDP Brakes, Motorcar Parts of America, MotoRad and Standard Motor Products. The group developed the “Check the Part” campaign to hit home with counter professionals, who are on the front lines of processing parts returns and weeding out warranty abuse.
      Endorsed by AASA and the Auto Care Association, the campaign’s messaging is simple:
      √ Open the box.
      √ Inspect the part.
      √ Verify the return.
      Shocks and Struts
      Recently, KYB published a return guide for shocks and struts. If a customer wants to return shocks or struts, KYB offers these five tips to help determine if it’s a valid warranty claim or not.
      Confirm that the brand on the part matches the brand on the box. Some customers might try to return worn OEM parts, or parts from a different aftermarket brand. If the part hasn’t been installed previously, it can be returned – but it should not be processed as a warranty. You can check if a shock is missing hardware by looking at images on the manufacturer’s website. If a part is missing hardware, you can order hardware and place the part back into inventory. A part that was damaged during installation can be denied as a warranty claim. Inspect the rod for vice-grip marks. If a shock or strut is leaking, someone likely used vice grips during installation and those marks damaged the seal, causing a fluid leak. This is not a valid reason for a warranty and should be denied. You can download a PDF of the return guide below:
      link hidden, please login to view link hidden, please login to view The post
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    • By Counterman
      In the October issue of AMN/Counterman, we covered the Automotive Sales Council’s
      link hidden, please login to view – an initiative that aims to reduce the sky-high return rate in the automotive aftermarket. Members of the Automotive Sales Council include representatives from KYB, Dorman Products, FDP Brakes, Motorcar Parts of America, MotoRad and Standard Motor Products. The group developed the “Check the Part” campaign to hit home with counter professionals, who are on the front lines of processing parts returns and weeding out warranty abuse.
      Endorsed by AASA and the Auto Care Association, the campaign’s messaging is simple:
      √ Open the box.
      √ Inspect the part.
      √ Verify the return.
      Recently, Dorman published a return guide for a catalytic converter with integrated exhaust manifold – also known as a manifold converter.
      If a customer wants to return a manifold converter, Dorman recommends these four steps to determine if it’s a valid warranty claim:
      Verify it’s the right part type. Some customers try to return unrelated products and heavy objects as a scam. Verify that the catalyst substrate is intact. If it’s oily, broken or sooty, the vehicle might need additional repair and the converter might not be covered under warranty policy. Verify that the part has been used. A heated-up or used manifold can be red from rust or a blueish color on its outer shell. If it isn’t discolored, it may be new and unmounted, and therefore can be sold again. If it’s a Dorman part, verify the part number. Dorman converters have welded tags or laser etching with part number, so you can be sure it’s the right part in the box. You can download a PDF of the return guide below:
      link hidden, please login to view link hidden, please login to view The post
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    • By Counterman
      In an ongoing effort to expand its current product offering for the North American automotive aftermarket, AISIN has expanded its line of premium window regulators.
      The launch includes late-model Asian, domestic and European vehicle applications. 
      The 201 SKUs include:
      95 power with motor (51 of the “smart motor” type covering Honda/Acura, Nissan and Mazda vehicle applications) 53 power regulator only 46 motor only Seven manual only All AISIN window regulators are designed and manufactured to the highest OE level standards, according to the company.
      “AISIN continues to bring needed premium-quality parts to the aftermarket, which is reflected by this newly expanded product offering,” said Larrow Kaufman, senior sales manager for AISIN Aftermarket North America.
      For more information, visit
      link hidden, please login to view. The post
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    • DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.


      DIY like a pro! Shop from over 1,000,000 Repair Manuals at eManualOnline.com! As low as $14.99 per manual. Shop now.

    • By Counterman
      Admittedly, windshield wipers aren’t the most glamorous component on a vehicle. For many drivers, they’re merely an afterthought – until they can barely see out their windshield. With winter weather approaching, however, this is an ideal time to talk to your customers about replacing their worn-out wiper blades before they become a serious safety hazard.
      Signs of Wear
      Most manufacturers recommend replacing wiper blades every six to 12 months. That’s all well and good, but the reality is that wipers are among the most overlooked maintenance items on a vehicle. If the rubber blade hasn’t completely disintegrated, chances are some of your customers will insist on keeping them until there’s a total failure. There’s an even greater chance your customers don’t even know when their wipers need to be replaced because they don’t know what to look for on the blade.
      With the seasons changing, now is a great time to encourage your customers to inspect their wiper blades for signs of wear. Studies show that winter and summer can be especially harsh on wiper blades. With rain, snow and sleet pelting our windshields as we approach the end of the year, visibility behind the wheel is more likely to be top of mind for many drivers who otherwise ignore their wipers.
      According to
      link hidden, please login to view (part of the First Brands Group), motorists should look for these signs of wear. Some might be discoverable by physically examining the blades, while other problems will be more apparent when the windshield wipers are in use. Streaking/smearing
      Worn and dirty wiper blades are a major cause of streaking.
      Skipping/chattering
      If wiper blades go unused for a long period of time, they can develop a curvature that causes them to not make proper contact with the windshield. This can result in a skipping or chattering sound when they’re in use.
      Splitting
      Cold weather and freezing temperatures make the rubber hard and brittle, which can result in wiper blades splitting.
      Squeaking
      If there’s a buildup of dust, dirt or other debris on the windshield glass, the wipers won’t make a smooth pass and can make a squeaking sound.
      “The remedies for fixing streaking/smearing, squeaking and skipping/chattering windshield wiper blades are the same: Keep your windshield clean and free of dirt, dust and debris,” ANCO explains on its website. “Avoid operating your wipers on a dry windshield. If the windshield isn’t wet enough when you run the wiper blades, it can cause skipping that creates squeaky wipers. Clean your wiper blades with washer solvent or water to help eliminate streaks and smears.”
      If these remedies don’t address the problem, it’s probably time for new wiper blades.
      The same goes for wiper blades that are starting to split. The split will only get worse and will lead to poor wiping performance when it matters most – while driving in rain, snow or ice.
      The biggest mistake most vehicle owners make is replacing only one wiper (the bad one) instead of the pair. They think they’re saving money, but if one side is worn out, the other side isn’t far behind. Better to replace them both at the same time because both blades are needed to keep the entire windshield clear. Also, if they drive an SUV, minivan or hatchback, it’s a good idea to replace the wiper blade on the rear window while they’re at it.
      Winter Survival Tips
      ANCO offers a number of tips for keeping wiper blades in working order during the winter months. For example, some motorists who don’t have a garage will pull the blades up and away from the windshield when their vehicle is parked outside overnight. The idea is to prevent ice from building up on the blades and preventing the blades from sticking to the windshield. However, some people argue that this practice causes unnecessary wear and tear on the springs in the wiper arm.
      A less controversial suggestion is to make sure the wipers are turned off when parking the vehicle. This way, when the vehicle starts up, the wipers won’t automatically start operating, which can potentially damage the wipers if the windshield is coated with snow and ice.
      For motorists who are really passionate about protecting their wiper blades, they can cover them with tube socks when not in use, or wipe the blades with rubbing alcohol to prevent them from freezing to the windshield. And for goodness sake, use an ice scraper – not the windshield wipers – to clear ice and snow from the windshield. Sitting in the vehicle with the defroster on max while the wipers struggle to break through a thick layer of snow and/or ice is a recipe for damaging the wiper blades.
      The post
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