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How To: Change O2 Sensors (Oxygen Sensor)


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    • By AutoZone
      MEMPHIS, Tenn. , Nov. 03, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- AutoZone, Inc. (NYSE: AZO) today announced that Lindsay Lehman , a three-year AutoZoner and Vice President, Marketing, has been promoted to Senior Vice President, Marketing, effective November 6, 2023 .
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    • By Counterman
      Continental has added eight new part numbers to its line of OEM knock sensors.  
      The sensors are the same part that the vehicle manufacturer uses and deliver the exact fit, form and function as the original part, ensuring an easy installation and long service life, according to Continental.
      The eight new part numbers provide application coverage for some of the most popular domestic, European and Asian makes and models on the road today. The expanded line covers Chrysler, Dodge, Ford, Infiniti, Jeep, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Mercury, Nissan and Ram models ranging from 2000 to 2023. The new sensors provide coverage for 28.8 million vehicles in operation (VIO) in the United States and 2.4 million vehicles in Canada.
      “Our newly expanded line was developed to meet the growing need for reliable knock sensors on some of the most common vehicles on the road today,” noted Brendan Bachant, Continental product manager for engine management and fuel. “The original sensors can be prone to failure due to mechanical damage, excessive vibration, high engine temperatures, and corrosion. Continental has made these OEM sensors available to the aftermarket so that professional technicians can easily and confidently service the most common vehicles in the shop, like the Ford F-150 and Explorer, the Jeep Wrangler and the Nissan Maxima and Altima. Technicians can be confident when choosing the Continental knock sensor that they will avoid comebacks.”
      Knock sensors are designed to detect engine ping caused by pre-ignition and relay the information to the electronic control unit to adjust engine timing and help keep the engine running smoothly. These sensors are an ideal repair for a rough-running engine with a timing and knock-sensor fault code and will help shops to restore the performance of their customers’ vehicles to OE specifications, according to Continental.
      Continental knock sensors are built in ISO-certified facilities to deliver the highest level of dependability, the company noted.
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    • By Counterman
      Bartec TPMS announced the release of its next-generation Rite-Sensor, the RS-2000. 
      “First and foremost, to ensure a smooth transition for our customers, the second-generation Rite-Sensor was designed to be completely backward-compatible with the first-generation version,” Bartec TPMS Product Manager Matthew Hitchcock said. “The second generation will allow us to continue our progress towards 100% vehicle coverage.”
      “The RS-2000 was designed to work on vehicles with high-line TPMS – that is vehicles with wheel-arch initiators,” Bartec CEO Scot Holloway said. “This new design also means improved sensor performance, and future diagnostics, all aimed at making our customers more successful servicing TPMS vehicles.”
      Launched in September, the new Rite-Sensor is available now through authorized resellers.
      To activate the additional vehicle coverage, users of the following Bartec TPMS Tools – the Tech600pro, Tech550Pro, Tech450 Pro or TechRITEPro – need to download and install update 6.0. Users of the Tech500Pro, Tech400Pro and Tech300Pro need to get update 66.0. 
      As always, all tool updates are available (with a current account) at
      link hidden, please login to view, or by using the TPMS Desktop. To learn more about the new Rite-Sensor and other Bartec technology, visit the Bartec booth (41057) at this year’s SEMA Show.
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    • By Counterman
      Sealed-beam headlights were simple and easy. For years, that’s all there was. A headlight was held into its bucket by a round or rectangular stainless-steel trim piece, with either three or four screws. Sometimes you had to remove a decorative trim piece first, but still always just a few screws.
      Then it got even easier throughout the 1980s as the industry transitioned from the traditional sealed beam to composite headlights with replaceable halogen bulbs. There wasn’t anything wrong with the sealed-beam design; they worked great. But there were only a few options, which limited automotive design.
      With composite headlights, automakers were designing cars with the look and aerodynamics that were previously restricted by one simple part. The best thing was, you simply opened the hood, and you could see the rear of the headlamps with the connector for the bulb protruding out the back. You unplugged the bulb, removed a retaining ring and out it came. It was that easy, and many still are that way. There’s not much to it.
      Sticker Shock
      However, all good things come to an end, and we’re seeing more and more cars where the aerodynamics, the shape of the front end and the tight, space-restricted engine compartments make it impossible to get to (or in many cases even see) the rear of the headlamp.
      Often, you must completely remove the headlamp to access the bulb. Sometimes you have to remove fender liners, or in worst-case scenarios, even the bumper cover or grille. There are times when it may take 45 minutes or longer to replace a headlight bulb. It’s uncommon – but it happens, nonetheless.
      Replacing headlight bulbs typically has been so simple for so long that most consumers have been programmed to think it’s a quick and easy job. You could literally replace one in less than a minute, and many shops – especially for regular customers – got in the habit of replacing them for only the cost of the bulb.
      That’s become a thing of the past as they get harder and harder to get to. Imagine the consumer’s shock to tell them it’s going to be $50 to $70 in labor just to replace a headlight bulb. That’s when a lot of people decide they can do it themselves. How hard can it be after all? Either way, getting access to the bulb is Step 1. You’re home free after that, but there are a few particulars to pay attention to, which hold true for any headlight-bulb replacement.
      Don’t Touch the Bulb
      First and foremost: Don’t touch the bulb. Many people ask why. The natural oils on your skin will transfer to the surface of the bulb. As the bulb heats up, it expands. If there’s oil on it, that spot will get much hotter than the rest, expand at a different rate and cause it to crack or shatter.
      The best advice is to leave the bulb in its packaging until after you’ve removed the original and are ready to reinstall the new one. Then carefully remove it, holding it by the electrical connector. Compare it to make sure it’s the same, then install it in the housing. If it does get oil on it or you accidentally touch it, you can simply wipe it down with rubbing alcohol and a clean rag.
      Inspect the Wiring Connector
      When the bulb is disconnected, it’s important to look closely at the wiring connector. It’s very common for them to be melted and burned. This often is the root cause of the headlight light not working as opposed to a bad bulb. It happens because headlight bulbs get very hot, and they go through continuous heat and cooling cycles. This constant expansion and contraction eventually weakens the tension on the electrical terminals, creating high resistance.
      With resistance comes additional heat, and some aftermarket bulbs may draw a higher amperage than OE bulbs, compounding the problem. Since this problem is so common, most of the common wiring-harness connectors are readily available as a pigtail (connector with wires installed), and just have to be spliced onto the original harness. Some of them feature design improvements to handle higher heat and a higher current too.
      If you’re replacing a sealed-beam headlight, it’s still a good idea to closely inspect the wiring connector. These often look OK, but don’t provide a good connection. They frequently go bad too due to corrosion and age, primarily because they aren’t sealed. These connectors are still available, as well as a pigtail harness.
      The adjusters on sealed-beam headlights also break a lot simply due to age, but these are generally available too, so they’re a good upsell, and usually an easy one. Most cars with sealed-beam lights are classics, which people are willing to invest time and money in. With composite lights, this is the perfect time to sell a headlight polishing kit to bring clarity back to old lenses. So, changing headlight bulbs? It’s usually easy, but it can be hard, and there’s always an opportunity to help your customer make the most of the job.
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    • Incfile.com
    • By Counterman
      In link hidden, please login to view, we gave leaders from the major distribution groups and trade associations an opportunity to reflect on the most critical issues affecting the automotive aftermarket. For the second year in a row, we let distribution leaders “riff” on these topics in their own words.
      Here’s what Robert Roos, president/CEO of the Pronto Automotive Distribution Network, had to say on the current state of the aftermarket.
      When I stop and take a minute to reflect on the current state of the automotive aftermarket, I am both overwhelmed and amazed at the amount of change and innovation taking place at all levels of distribution today. Never in my nearly 40 years in this industry have I experienced such a fast-paced and significant number of challenges facing our members, customers and supplier partners. 
      We are faced with emerging technologies; the battle for access to data; unprecedented consolidation at all levels of the supply chain; and the challenge of labor shortages – all while attempting to fight the day-to-day battles to win business against increasing competition from a variety of different fronts. And yet our industry continues to thrive. Resiliency is the word I like to use when talking about the automotive aftermarket. How would anyone predict the kind of results our industry continues to show in the midst of economic challenges, supply chain issues and a variety of other pressures we face?
      I believe it is our ability to adapt and change at such a rapid pace that allows us to continue to thrive. We are a close-knit community and while we may compete against one another, we also know when to work together for the betterment of all. We work together to increase involvement in the issues that challenge all of us today, whether it is supporting the Repair Act to ensure our access to the necessary data to maintain everyone’s ability to keep safe vehicles on the road at a reasonable cost; working to increase awareness of our labor shortage within the industry; or creating new ways to make our industry safer for the environment and increase our sustainability footprint.
      To continue the success of the past, we must remain alert to these issues and others that may develop as our industry continues its rapid paced transformation. We have a responsibility to keep our entire industry informed of these very important issues. Thankfully, we are better prepared to do this today than ever before. We have our industry associations, program groups, various networking groups and others spreading the word. We have industry events that encourage participation and educate attendees on the important issues of the day. I am confident that the automotive aftermarket of today is ready for what the future holds. I am proud of our industry, what we have accomplished and those things we will accomplish in the future. We are prepared to meet the challenges of today and tomorrow head-on and with a passion unlike any other.
      What is the current state of the aftermarket? In a sentence I would say our industry is economically sound, poised for the future and ready to keep consumers on the road no matter what challenges lie ahead. In a word, my answer would be resilient.
      The Pronto Network       
      Founded: Formed from the merger of National Pronto Association and The Automotive Distribution Network in 2021 Headquarters: Grapevine, Texas Number of members/shareholders: 200+ Number of distribution centers: 375+ Number of parts stores: 1,500+ Number of suppliers: 200+ Website: link hidden, please login to view The post
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