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FleetPride Acquires Nationwide Truck Service In Kentucky


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FleetPride announced that it has acquired the assets of Nationwide Truck Service of Louisville, Kentucky.

Founded in 1989 and owned by Eric Adkins, Nationwide Truck Service offers a wide range of repair services from its 21-bay facility and mobile repair units in addition to 24/7 roadside support.

The Service Center at 355 Farmington Ave. will team up with the existing FleetPride parts branch at 4670 Jennings Lane in Louisville, “creating a complete value proposition for customers,” according to FleetPride. Adkins and his son, Jake, will remain involved in the day-to-day operations.

“This is an outstanding opportunity for our valued customers and our team,” said Adkins. “Our customers will appreciate the access to a nationwide network of parts and service, and our employees will have the ability to grow and advance in FleetPride’s new service organization.”

“We are truly excited to welcome Eric and Jake Adkins and the entire Nationwide Truck Service team to the FleetPride family,” said Cory Anderson, general manager and vice president of service at FleetPride. “Over the past three decades, the Nationwide team has become one of the most trusted independent service providers, which customers have come to depend on, in Louisville.”

“Growth through acquisitions remains a focus for our company,” said Mike Harris, senior vice president of sales and operations at FleetPride. “We believe our value proposition resonates with owners of parts and service companies who are seeking a succession plan, or a partner that can provide a long-term foundation for their employees and customers. We look forward to the partnership with the Nationwide Truck Service team to carry on their tradition of service excellence while expanding service capabilities to our existing customers including large regional and national fleets.”

FleetPride continues to grow its national parts and service operations. If you are interested in learning more about how to become part of the FleetPride network, visit 

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 for more details.

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Wow, that's truly incredible! I didn't even know about that. I know that some people might not agree with me on this one, but I think it's great for both FleetPride and Nationwide Truck Service of Louisville, Kentucky. It will help both of these companies evolve much more and finally reach a higher level.

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On 3/31/2022 at 6:12 AM, Eygon said:

Wow, that's truly incredible! I didn't even know about that. I know that some people might not agree with me on this one, but I think it's great for both FleetPride and Nationwide Truck Service of Louisville, Kentucky. It will help both of these companies evolve much more and finally reach a higher level. My dad used to work at the Kentucky Nationwide Truck Service. He had a very old truck that was in a terrible state, but he didn't want to sell it. When he moved to the UK, he decided to take it with him, and I still don't know why. But still, my mom made him sell it as she found the guys from

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and they were ready to pay a good price for that.

Now my wife is telling me the same thing about my own truck

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