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CRP Automotive Names Matt Zarlenga 2021 US Sales Rep Of The Year


Counterman

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CRP Automotive has named Matt Zarlenga of the Sherman-Pearson Co. as its 2021 U.S. Sales Representative of the Year.

Zarlenga has been with Sherman-Pearson Co. since 2019 and has represented CRP Automotive’s AAE, REIN, Pentosin and AJUSA brands in the Northern and Central Ohio market. CRP Automotive presented the award to Zarlenga during the 2021 AAPEX Show in Las Vegas.

CRP Automotive Channel Sales Manager Nicole Ryan and U.S & Canada Sales Director Warren Morley presented the award.

“Matt exemplifies what makes a professional sales representative successful and has done a great job for us in our Northern territory,” Ryan said. “He always brings a great deal of enthusiasm, energy, and product knowledge to our sales efforts.”

Zarlenga accepted the award on behalf of Sherman-Pearson, noting that the accomplishments in 2021 were the result of a solid team effort and made possible only by the dedication and hard work of everyone involved.

Prior to joining Sherman-Pearson Co., Zarlenga was a manufacturer representative with Bowdoin Marketing specializing in the automotive aftermarket. He also worked in the OE dealership channel as a sales consultant and warranty administrator.

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