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NGK/NTK And The Aftermarket ‘Pour It Forward’ At AAPEX


Counterman
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NGK Spark Plugs continues its commitment to the automotive aftermarket and The University of the Aftermarket Foundation (UAF).

To support this, the NGK and NTK brands hosted a “Pour It Forward” invitational at AAPEX this year to support the UAF Coffee Club donor campaign.

Invited guests received a donation to the UAF Coffee Club in their company’s name for visiting the NGK/NTK  booth. Invitees then had the opportunity to double the contribution by participating in an in-booth challenge game.

NGK and NTK would like to thank the following customers, colleagues and industry partners who visited us and played the “Cliff Hanger Challenge” to raise a UAF Coffee Club donation of $2,500.

  • 10 Missions Media
  • AASA
  • ACI
  • Advance Auto Parts
  • Aftermarket Auto Parts Alliance
  • APH
  • APW Knox-Seeman Warehouse
  • Automotive Experts Marketing Group Auto Plus
  • AutoZone
  • AVI
  • Babcox Media
  • Endeavor Business Media
  • Epicor
  • Federated Auto Parts
  • Genuine Parts Company
  • Hanson Distributing
  • Hovis Auto Supply
  • NPW
  • O’Reilly Auto Parts
  • Parts Authority
  • Pep Boys
  • Pronto Network
  • RPS Marketing
  • Tri-State Enterprises
  • UAF
  • UAF Veterans
    • Bob Eagan
    • Pete and Anne Kornafel
    • Jennifer Tio
  • Undercar Plus
  • Universal

To donate and join the club, visit www.UofA-Foundation.org/CoffeeClub, choose a level of recurring support and complete the form. All contributions are tax-deductible to the extent provided by law.

The post NGK/NTK And The Aftermarket ‘Pour It Forward’ At AAPEX appeared first on Counterman Magazine.

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