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Wrecking 2008 BMW X5 3.0L Diesel Turbo 152257km


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    • By Counterman
      Here in Northeast Ohio, we recently experienced a “cold snap.” Temperatures dropped below zero degrees Fahrenheit, with wind chills approaching minus 20 F. Needless to say, most people were caught off-guard by the temperatures, and how long that cold weather stuck around.
      It highlighted just how much we’re affected by our climate, and for that matter, our cars and trucks. Drivers lost control on highways and had to be towed out of the ditch along the highway, while others weren’t able to start their engine thanks to a weakened battery. I remember many things from my time behind the parts counter, but none more so than this: With each new season comes a pattern of vehicle repairs or needs. You’ll never sell more wiper blades than on a rainy day, and you’ll sell more batteries when temperatures climb or drop to extreme levels. Today, I want to focus on diesel engines and the challenges they face during the winter months.
      Diesel engines typically are associated with larger pickups, thanks in part to their workhorse nature and their abundant torque production. But cold weather is rather harsh on diesel fuel and the fuel system. When temperatures dip, it can form into a gel instead of a liquid. Cold diesel fuel is harder to ignite under compression, which means the engine has to crank longer than usual. In extreme cold, the engine might become difficult to start even when the glow plugs are given the time to do their job.
      Diesel fuel has changed quite a bit in recent decades. The United States has mandated the use of ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel in an effort to improve air quality. But this also has brought about some chemical changes in the refining process, and with it, some new challenges to overcome. Those chemical changes have caused an increase in paraffin inside the fuel, which can lead to a buildup of wax particles. Those wax particles can form larger crystals that can clog up fuel lines, filters and so on.
      Condensation inside the fuel also is a concern. Condensation is a major contributor to rust, cold-weather icing and microorganism growth in warmer weather. Diesel engines can operate much better when corrosion and bacteria growth are prevented.
      The Solution: Fuel Additives
      Additives aren’t new. In fact, they’re present inside each and every container of oil you carry in your store. When it comes to diesel-fuel additives, they have a simple job to do: Help the diesel fuel to resist the effects of the cold weather. Fuel treatments help to reduce fuel gelling by encapsulating and dispersing those waxy crystals as they’re formed. When done right, this can prevent them from growing large enough to clog any of the components in the fuel system. The fuel is then able to flow more easily through the fuel filters and lines and into the combustion chamber where it can be burned.
      Some fuel treatments will contain some or all of the following additives. Lubricity additives help to protect diesel-fuel systems from internal wear. Lubricity additives help the fuel to form a boundary layer of lubrication between the metallic parts inside the fuel system. This film helps to reduce friction between the metal surfaces, and the wear and tear on them. This can extend the life of those components and reduce downtime in the future. Cetane boosters increase the flammability of the diesel fuel, and this allows for a cleaner-burning diesel engine.
      What Should You Tell Your Customers?
      To most customers, fuel treatments can be thought of as just another routine maintenance item. Most fuel treatments will need to be poured into the fuel tank at each fill-up, but it’s best practice to always reference the usage guidelines from the manufacturer.
      If you need help to overcome a cost objection, I wouldn’t suggest trying to scare them with the cost of potential breakdowns or repairs down the road. In my eyes, fuel treatments are simply a “peace-of-mind” sort of sale. Their job is simple, and their objectives are clear. So, if we place ourselves into the customer’s shoes, the benefit they have to offer is the peace of mind that their diesel engine will continue to operate without issue throughout the colder winter months. While it’s true that they can reduce the risk of costly repairs or breakdowns later on, I wouldn’t lead with that thought.
      The need for diesel-fuel treatment products will definitely spike as the temperatures start to dip. So, I would invite you to take a few moments to read the labels on the products you carry in your store, and familiarize yourself with what separates one from the next. Then, you’ll be ready to help your customers find the right product for their diesel-powered vehicle.
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    • By Counterman
      CRP Automotive offers Rein Automotive TechSelect Turbo Kits (CRP P/N TRK0007) for some of the most popular BMW applications on the road today. These kits are a solution for turbocharger replacement service and include all of the hoses, gaskets, and hardware necessary to complete the job quickly and efficiently.
      Developed with technicians in mind, Rein Automotive TechSelect Turbo Kits include the most recent turbo hose versions, and include all brackets, hardware, and necessary sealing components for installation. This allows shops to order all of the components needed to complete a turbocharger service by using one part number.
      Rein Automotive TechSelect Turbo Kits are available for popular BMW applications that use the N54 and N55 engines, including the 335i, 335i xDrive, 335is and 335xi, from model years 2007-2018. Additional coverage is available for vehicles with N20 and N26 engines including the 320i and 328i from 2012-2018, among others.
      “We developed these TechSelect kits to make turbocharger replacement easier,” noted David Hirschhorn, CRP Automotive brand director. “As these vehicles reach higher mileage, the turbocharger system begins to wear out and most of the system components can’t be reused. Our TechSelect Turbo Kits provide a one-stop solution, giving technicians confidence in knowing that they have all the necessary parts to complete the job and avoid comebacks.”
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    • By Counterman
      Akebono Brake Corp. recently expanded its EURO and Performance ultra-premium lines of disc brake pads.
      Akebono added three new part numbers to its EURO line: EUR1850, EUR1850A and EUR1850B. The company added one new part number to its Akebono Performance line: ASP1718. An electronic wear sensor and premium stainless steel abutment hardware are included in the kits that require them.
      The release includes EURO brake pads with premium stainless hardware and electronic wear sensor for BMW 530e, 530e xDrive, 530i, 530i xDrive, 540i, 540i xDrive, 745e xDrive, 840i Gran Coupe, 840i xDrive Gran Coupe, M550i xDrive, BMW X3 M40i, X3 sDrive 30i, X3 xDrive 30e, X3 30i, BMW X5 M50i, X5 sDrive 40i, X5 xDrive 40i, X5 xDrive 45e, X6 M50i, X6 sDrive 40i, X6 xDrive 40i and X7 xDrive 40i. Akebono Performance brake pads add coverage for Cadillac ATS V, Chevrolet Camaro SS and Corvette.
      “We are thrilled to announce that today’s release of three new EURO and one new Akebono Performance part numbers, which include significate late-model coverage for BMW and GM in which VIO (vehicles in operation) is above 640,000,” said Jennifer Lajcaj, marketing specialist at Akebono Brake Corp. “All of these parts are in-stock and ready for shipment.”
      A complete listing of Akebono applications for these parts and the rest of Akebono’s product offering is available at akebonobrakes.com or directly via https://akebonobrakes.mypartfinder.com/.
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    • By Counterman
      When I hear the term diesel, the first thing I always picture in my mind is an 18-wheeler. Then my thoughts drift to gleaming chrome stacks, tons of load-hauling torque and the sounds of a semi-truck. The next thing you know I’m kicking back to watch the greatest trucking movie of all time, “Convoy,” for what’s probably the 10th time.
      I’m sure it’s generational, because growing up, diesel engines were only popular in heavy-duty trucks. Whether the big rigs defined the persona of a diesel engine or vise-versa I’m not sure, but to me the term “diesel” always has been synonymous with power and strength. So, what’s a light diesel? It seems like a contradiction of terms to me.
      A light diesel in the simplest way of thinking is anything diesel-powered that resides in someone’s driveway as daily transportation, including everything from cars to pickup trucks. The true definition gets a little muddy at a certain point because the federal standards have different weight cut-offs for their light-truck classifications.
      Using these standards, most full-size pickup trucks are all considered light-duty, even when they’re equipped with torque-monster diesel engines. But, if it’s a dually crew-cab 1-ton, it just might make it into the heavy-duty classification. Either way, it really doesn’t matter. Parts are parts, and if they’re driving it and fixing it, they’ll look to you – the counter professional – for what they need.
      Diesel Drill-Down
      As with any subject, knowledge gives you the power to sell, so I’ll start with what’s different about a diesel. There are three things that diesels are typically known for: fuel economy; lots of power; and long life.
      Why does a diesel engine get better fuel economy? Diesel fuel has a higher energy density than gasoline. This means that it takes less of it to produce the same amount of power resulting from combustion. Diesel engines also have much higher compression ratios than gasoline because the fuel is ignited by the heat of compression, and higher compression ratios in general lead to increased combustion efficiency.
      Why do they produce more power? Although modern diesel engines have the ability to produce incredibly high horsepower numbers, the “power” normally associated with a diesel engine is actually high torque. Torque is low rpm power for pulling, and horsepower is the high rpm power for acceleration. Diesel trucks are designed for pulling, which is why torque is so important.
      When the air/fuel mixture burns in a gasoline engine, it burns quickly, and the force of the expanding gasses drives the piston down in the cylinder. This creates power. However, once the air/fuel mixture has burned and the piston is traveling downward, the further down it goes, the less force is exerted upon it.
      Diesel fuel burns slowly. When the combustion process begins, the force of the expanding gasses pushes the piston downwards, but the air/fuel mixture continues to burn as the piston travels downward, exerting continuous force on the piston until it nears the bottom of the stroke. This continuous force on the piston is why diesel engines produce so much torque. Modern electronic control of diesel-fuel systems has allowed them to precisely control fuel-injection time to maximize this effect.
      Do they really last longer? As long as they’re properly maintained, yes – and here’s why. Gasoline is a harsh solvent with no lubricity. It wreaks havoc on everything it comes into contact with, including the inside of the cylinders in an engine. Diesel fuel, on the other hand, has a high level of lubricity, drastically reducing cylinder wear.
      Another reason for increased longevity also has to do with the slower speed in which the diesel fuel burns. The combustion of gasoline is a violent process that applies incredible stresses on the rotating assembly, whereas the diesel-fuel combustion process is less violent, applying a steady, continuous downward force on the piston.
      Then there’s temperature. Diesel fuel ignites at a lower temperature than gasoline, so combustion temperatures, as well as exhaust temperatures, are lower. And finally, there’s construction. Because of the higher compression ratios, diesel engines are built stronger and sturdier from the block and heads to the rotating assembly, often with increased oil capacity and improved oiling systems.
      Sales Opportunities
      In recent years, there’s been turmoil and scandal related to diesel-powered vehicles, and now there’s plenty of speculation that the end of the diesel isn’t too far off. But diesel owners aren’t ready to give up – meaning parts opportunities abound. With fewer diesel vehicles available, there will be a stronger push to keep the current ones on the road.
      Some areas of repair – such as timing belts, water pumps and hoses – ultimately don’t differ from a gasoline vehicle. However, an area where you can capitalize is maintenance. Diesel engines can last a long time, and that longer service life extends the opportunity to sell maintenance items.
      Fuel Treatment
      An immediate area to take advantage of is fuel treatment. The fuel system is the heart of a diesel. Fuel quantity controls engine speed. There’s no ignition system, and there’s no air-volume control or throttle plates like those on a gasoline vehicle. (In case a customer decides to call you out, there are some diesels with throttle plates, but they don’t have anything to do with controlling engine speed – they only smooth out engine shutdown and increase exhaust-gas recirculation.)
      Diesels have complex and expensive injection pumps and injectors. Not only does diesel fuel extend cylinder life with its lubricity, but it also preserves the life of the fuel system itself.
      The problem is that in order to reduce air pollution, ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel was introduced in 2006. By losing the sulfur, diesel fuel also lost the majority of its lubricity. This can be, will be and has been a big problem. Diesel-fuel treatments add back this lubricity, and while they may seem expensive to a customer, a small bottle treats many gallons, and if it’s properly measured, it ultimately only results in a minor fuel-cost increase.
      Cold-weather performance is another problem. Diesel fuel has always had a tendency to gel in extremely cold temperatures, and the loss of sulfur has made it worse. Diesel-fuel additives will combat this problem as well. Additives also battle cylinder deposits, and on a diesel engine these deposits soak up diesel fuel and effect fuel economy. Fuel additives should be recommended for continuous use.
      Filters
      Next on the easy-sell list is filters. Air filters fall under standard replacement guidelines that you’re used to, but fuel filters are an area to concentrate on. Contaminants can be very damaging to diesel-fuel pumps and injectors, and water accumulation in diesel fuel is a common problem. Diesel fuel often is stored for longer periods of time than gasoline, and the water accumulation is a result of condensation from temperature change.
      For this reason, almost every piece of heavy equipment has an individual water separator, and even many small diesel cars have water-drain valves in the bottom of their fuel filters. Generally, water accumulation isn’t a problem at larger-volume gas stations, but there’s no way of knowing for sure, so it’s better to err on the side of caution. Diesel-fuel filters should be replaced at least once a year.
      Performance
      Performance upgrades are common among diesel enthusiasts – especially intake and exhaust systems – but it can be a difficult market to get into since there are so many different options and applications. The best opportunities lie with accessories and upgrades that fit all models, such as gauges, lighting and interior accessories.
      Oil Changes
      When diesel fuel burns, it leaves behind black soot. This soot finds its way past the piston rings into the crankcase and turns the engine oil black. Even when changing the oil, there’s almost always enough residual oil in the pan and throughout the engine that the new oil is black almost immediately. The soot doesn’t harm the properties and performance of the oil, but think of it like any dirt particles: If there’s too much of it, the oil performance will degrade.
      It’s easy to see oil condition on the dipstick of a gasoline engine, but on a diesel there’s no way of telling. It’s critical for vehicle owners to document oil-change mileage so they don’t go over. It’s best to follow manufacturer recommendations for oil type, and it’s a good idea to recommend a high-quality oil filter. While diesel-powered cars typically have standard oil capacities, many pickup trucks have much higher capacities – sometimes 10 quarts or more. If your customer isn’t sure, take the extra step of looking it up so they don’t get home and end up short.
      Cleanup
      If your customer is doing an oil change, this is the perfect time to sell latex gloves, disposable rags and other cleaning supplies. Diesel oil will stain your hands for an entire day, and it doesn’t help the look of your garage floor either. We always should wear gloves to protect our skin during an oil change, but admittedly I don’t always do that on a gasoline vehicle. Diesel is a different story.
      Diesel Exhaust Fluid
      For the 2010 model year, the EPA mandated that diesel engines reduce the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), which is linked to the formation of acid rain and smog. Diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) is what allowed manufacturers to meet these requirements. DEF is a solution of urea and deionized water that’s injected into the exhaust system before the catalytic converter. The chemical reaction forms ammonia, which then works in conjunction with the catalyst to convert NOx into nitrogen and water.
      It’s ultimately a simple solution, but diesel owners need to keep the DEF reservoirs full. If the DEF runs out, the vehicle will not start. If they’re running, they won’t quit, but often go into a low-power mode.
      Block Heaters
      Historically, diesel engines were known for difficult cold-weather starting, since the heat of compression ignites the fuel. Modern combustion-chamber design and technology have greatly improved this problem, but in the far northern regions of the United States and in Canada, diesel owners often don’t have a choice but to install a block heater. Even in areas where starting isn’t a problem, block heaters are popular in the winter since diesel engines take a long time to warm up.
      There are two different types of heaters. Most factory-style heaters are designed to fit directly into the engine block in place of a casting plug, which places a heating element directly into the engine coolant. This is generally the preferred method, as it’s the most effective.
      The second type of block heater is designed to mount flat on the bottom of an oil pan. The heat travels up through the pan and warms the engine oil. These are effective, but only given that they fit the pan properly and are out of harm’s way. Some factory applications are designed like this, but aftermarket designs are intended to be “universal,” and they don’t always work as well. Familiarize yourself with the heaters you have in stock, and what they fit, or where you can locate an application chart. Most people shopping for a block heater will know they want one – it’ll be an easy sale – but getting the correct one for the application is the hardest part.
      Tips for Your Customers
      The best advice you can give your customers is explaining the importance of diesel maintenance. A critical tip, however, involves replacement of a diesel-fuel filter. When a diesel runs out of fuel, air is drawn into the lines, and they simply won’t start until the air is bled out. Cranking the engine won’t do anything except overheat the starter.
      Some diesel trucks and heavy equipment are equipped with primers, such as those you may be familiar with on small engines. They’re designed to draw fuel from the tank and fill the filter and pump. Some newer vehicles have electronic primers that do this when the key is cycled on, but many diesel-powered cars don’t have either of these features. When the fuel filter is replaced, it needs to be filled with diesel fuel before connecting the lines. It often requires a small funnel, and it can take a few minutes to get it done, but it’s mandatory.
      Seasoned diesel owners should be familiar with fuel-filter replacement, but it never hurts to ask and make sure they are. You can save your customer a lot of trouble.
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    • eManualonline.com - Save 5% OFF on orders Over $50, Use Code Blaze. Ends 12/31/22.
    • By OReilly Auto Parts
      How To: Change the Headlights in a 2008 to 2020 Dodge Grand Caravan
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